World

100 Women: Conference in full

BBC 100 Women conference

On 25 October 2013 a unique group of 100 Women from around the world gathered in London for an ambitious day of debate and discussion at the BBC's Broadcasting House.

Guests included politicians, campaigners, actors, artists, and leaders from the fields of faith, business and technology, all spending the day alongside others whose work does not make global headlines.

The mix ensured a day of lively discussion, every moment of which was streamed live online, with much of the day broadcast on BBC World News TV and BBC World Service radio.

We have collated all the day's debates and sessions here on one page so you can catch up with what went on.

Let us know what you think and continue the conversation by using #100Women on social media.

0900 BST: Opening address

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Media captionWelcome and opening address by Zainab Bangura, UN special representative on the prevention of sexual violence in conflict

0930-1000: Global Gender Gap Report 2013

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Media captionThe World Economic Forum released its annual gender gap survey on the day of the BBC conference. We discussed the findings and spoke to women from the best- and worst-performing countries.

1000-1100: Spying, Syria and the Roma

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Media captionA special debate hosted by Lyse Doucet on spying revelations from the US, the situation in Syria and attitudes to the Roma people. Featuring Nervana Mahmoud, Helen Clark, Lina Sinjab of the BBC, Zainab Bangura, Klara Dobrev and Michaela Bergman.

1100: Martina Navratilova on breaking boundaries

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Media captionEighteen-time Grand Slam singles champion Martina Navratilova told the conference of the lessons she had learned from her struggles against prejudice.

1110-1130: Feminism in the 21st Century

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Media captionA brief discussion about the state of feminism today, featuring Anna Arrowsmith, Paris Lees, Ann Leslie and Natasha Walter.

1200-1300: The Big Ideas

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Media caption A special debate hosted by Lyse Doucet saw six women offer big ideas for the future, with the proposals debated by the rest of the room. Featuring Cherie Blair, Obiageli Ezekwesili, Selma James, Fazia Koofi, Cerrie Burnell and Claudia Paz y Paz.

1330-1400: Women in the media

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Media captionThe BBC's Razia Iqbal explored an emotive issue with Nadia al-Sakkaf, Kamila Shamsie, Susie Orbach, Moe Thuzar Aung, Sarah Rogers and Gurinder Chadha.

1400-1430: The glass ceiling debate

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Media captionLucy Hockings of BBC World News TV chaired a debate about economic opportunity and the glass ceiling with Helen Clark, Andy Kawa, Michaele Bergman, Heather Jackson and Rehana Azib.

1430-1500: The science and technology problem

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Media captionLucy Hockings asks a panel about the lack of women in science and technology. Featuring Sian Lindley, Irina Chakraborty, Divya Sharma, the BBC's Rebecca Morelle and Dama Athene Donald of Cambridge University.

1500-1600: Motherhood and equality

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Media captionIs motherhood a barrier to equality - and if it is, will it always be? The BBC's Nuala McGovern talks to Justine Roberts, Selma James, Laura Perrins, Klara Dobrev, Kamila Shamsie and Jody Day.

1600-1700: Faith and feminism

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Media captionThe final debate of the day was a fiery one, asking whether faith and feminism can coexist. Featuring Balvinder Saund, Caroline Farrow, Mirina Paananen, Rose Hudson-Wilkin, Laura Janner-Klausner and Kate Smurthwaite. Chaired by Chloe Tilley.

Closing address: Sigridur Maria Egilsdottir

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Media captionTo close the conference, Iceland's champion debater delivered an inspiring address in which she urged women to strive for education and insisted it was possible to end inequality.

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