World

A Richer World, divided cities

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Media captionA Richer World... but for whom?

The BBC's new A Richer World season is exploring the contrasts of wealth and inequality. The world is richer than ever before - but what does that mean for these four divided cities?

Across the world in 2015 we live longer, eat better, are better educated and there are fewer people living in extreme poverty.

In many ways, the world is richer than it has ever been. But that is only part of the story. Inequality is rising, with the gap between the rich and poor as big as it has ever been.

As the BBC's A Richer World season launches, here are four global cities which encapsulate the contrasts between the haves and the have-nots.

New York City

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Media captionNick Bryant presents New York City, US

When it comes to wealth in New York City, it's really a tale of two cities, says the BBC's Nick Bryant.

Manhattan has the biggest income gap in the whole of the US, he explains.

Santiago

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Media captionIgnacio de los Reyes presents Santiago, a divided city, as part of the BBC's A Richer World season

Chile's free market economic policies has made it one of the most stable economies in the developing world.

But the distribution of income is the most unequal among rich nations, explains the BBC's Ignacio de los Reyes from the capital Santiago.


Who are the winners and losers in this A Richer World 2015?


Islamabad

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Media captionNosheen Abbas presents Islamabad, Pakistan

Islamabad, once a quiet, non-commercialised city, is now a 24-hour building site, explains Nosheen Abbas.

And amidst the rapid development in Pakistan's capital, she says, there are those who take a week to earn even half of what others will spend on a fast-food snack.

Istanbul

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Media captionSelin Girit presents Istanbul, Turkey

Turkey is Europe's fastest emerging market, explains BBC reporter Selin Girit.

Away from the tourist spots in the capital city of Istanbul, she says, it's common for the super-rich to live side-by-side with the super-poor.

For more on the BBC's A Richer World season, click here