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'Circumcision controls women's sex common sense' - Sheikh Yussef al-Badri

19 June 2013 Last updated at 14:43 BST

Female genital mutilation was made illegal in Egypt in 2008 but is still very widely practiced. Some estimates suggest over 75% of women, Muslim and Christian, still have had the procedure in some areas of the country.

Debate on the subject has re-opened after the recent death of a 13-year-old girl while having the operation. Studies have also documented cases of serious health and psychological complications.

Sheikh Yussef al-Badri is one of Egypt's biggest advocates for what he refers to as female circumcision, and has petitioned the country's courts to make it legal again.

He told Aleem Maqbool that it removed a woman's "need for man".

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