Gen Khalifa Haftar: Libya bomb targets home near Benghazi

General Khalifa Haftar General Khalifa Haftar accuses the Libyan government of supporting terrorism

A suicide bomb attack at the home of a rogue Libyan general - who has been leading an offensive against Islamist militia groups - has killed four people.

General Khalifa Haftar survived the blast, which happened at his home in the town of Abyar, about 60km (37 miles) east of Benghazi.

Several people were wounded.

Gen Haftar's forces have been waging a campaign against Islamist armed groups in Benghazi for almost three weeks.

The general, who was an army chief-of-staff under Col Muammar Gaddafi, accuses the government of supporting terrorism, which the authorities deny.

His actions have been backed by an array of groups, including military forces in the east as well as some members of the air force.

He said that he was well after the attack and vowed a "strong response".

General Sager Al-Jarushi, a senior commander allied to Gen Haftar, told the BBC that four guards were killed in the attack.

Libyan militiamen loyal to rogue general Khalifa Haftar during clashes against Islamists in the eastern Libyan city of Benghazi on 2 June 2014 Benghazi has seen heavy fighting between Islamist militia and Gen Haftar's forces

Meanwhile, a Swiss national working for the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) has been killed in Sirte.

Michael Greub, the head of the organisation's Misrata branch, was shot dead as he left a meeting in the coastal town.

In a statement, the ICRC said it "vigorously condemned this heinous attack".

"We are devastated and outraged," said ICRC director-general Yves Daccorde. "Michael was a devoted humanitarian who spent many years of his life helping others," he added.

Country in turmoil

The attack on Gen Haftar is the first assassination attempt against the general since the launch of an offensive against hardline Islamists militias nearly three weeks ago, says the BBC's Rana Jawad in the capital, Tripoli.

Map showing Benghazi and Tripoli in Libya

Some 20 people died in fierce clashes between Gen Haftar's forces and Islamist fighters in Benghazi on Monday.

The groups Gen Haftar's forces are targeting are the Ansar al-Sharia Islamist militia and the February 17 brigade, which fought against Gaddafi in 2011.

No group has claimed responsibility for the latest attack.

Libya is still in turmoil three years after the fall of Gaddafi - with political, religious and political factions locked in disagreement about the country's future.

Officials in Tripoli have condemned an attack on the headquarters of the prime minister after a rocket hit the third floor of the building late on Tuesday night. It caused minor damage and no-one was hurt.

Our correspondent says at the moment Libya has two prime ministers.

Abdullah al-Thani resigned in April following an attack on his family. But he has yet to cede power as some MPs are unhappy about the election - in a chaotic session in parliament - of his successor, Ahmed Maiteg, and are challenging the appointment in court.

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