Burma train crash and fire kills 25

Wrecked train carriages in Burma, 9 November Dozens of people were injured in the accident

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A train carrying petrol has derailed and burst into flames in northern Burma, killing at least 25 people and injuring dozens more.

The information ministry said many of the dead and injured were villagers trying to collect spilled fuel.

The train was travelling from Mandalay to Myitkyina in the north, near the border with China.

No explanation has been given for the accident, but Burma's railways are in poor condition after years of neglect.

Officials told the BBC Burmese service that three wagons overturned and burst into flames.

There were seven wagons carrying petrol and two more of diesel, officials said.

The ministry posted images on its website of burnt-out wagons and what appeared to be charred bodies.

The train came off the rails near Kantbalu, a town some 500 miles (800km) north of the main city, Rangoon.

The number of people killed in the accident was unclear. The government said 25 people died and 62 people were injured.

But emergency officials told the BBC that more than 80 were wounded, and that 27 had been killed.

Two people died after being transferred to hospital, emergency officials said.

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