Thailand unrest: Opposition MPs pledge to resign

 

Abhisit Vejjajiva, leader of the Democrat Party of Thailand: "We no longer want to be part of this House of Representatives"

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Thailand's opposition MPs are to resign en masse, officials say, after weeks of anti-government protests in Bangkok.

Opposition-backed street protesters have been trying to oust PM Yingluck Shinawatra, saying she is controlled by her brother, former PM Thaksin.

Protest leader Suthep Thauksuban, a former deputy PM, has rejected dialogue and called for a final push to overthrow the government on Monday.

Ms Yingluck has proposed a referendum on the country's political crisis.

She repeated that she was ready to dissolve parliament and hold fresh elections if agreement could be reached with her opponents.

The protesters want Ms Yingluck's current government to step down and be replaced by an unelected "People's Council".

They allege that her government is controlled by her brother, former Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra, who is in self-imposed exile after he was overthrown in a military army coup in 2006 and convicted of corruption.

Final push

All 153 MPs of the main opposition Democrat party, Thailand's oldest, will resign.

A Thai policeman stands next to concrete barricades outside the gates of the prime minister's office, known as Government House, in Bangkok, Thailand The Thai prime minister has faced weeks of anti-government protests

They hold just under one third of the seats in the 500-seat parliament, where the the governing Pheu Thai party has a commanding majority.

"We decided to quit as MPs to march with the people against the Thaksin regime," Democrat Party MP Sirichok Sopha said in televised remarks.

Bangkok MP Sansern Samalapa wrote on his Facebook page: "The resignation en masse is intended to deny the parliamentary system of the Thaksin regime, which has run out of legitimacy, and we have fully performed the duty of the opposition."

Mr Suthep, a former Democrat MP, is calling Monday's final-push protest a last-ditch attempt to overthrow Ms Yingluck's government. Protesters say huge rallies will converge on Government House from nine directions.

If he fails, he says he will hand himself in to the police, who have issued an arrest warrant for him.

The government, despite all the criticisms made of it, still holds a clear majority in parliament, and is likely to win another election, its sixth in succession, if the prime minister does decide to call one, says the BBC's Jonathan Head in Bangkok.

 

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  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 49.

    You need a election when the government refuses to accept rulings of the court regarding the constitution which they have, they have become dictators refusing to accept court rulings, they have persisted with amnesty for a wanted criminal thaksin when he has not been to jail for 1 day, they indicted the 2 opposition leaders with murder they are dictators the world is sick of dictators.

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 48.

    Take Egypt as an example.....it works like this...
    First you get rid of someone you don't like because they ONLY did what they wanted...( Murbarack)... you then get in power (Morsi) to do ONLY what you want.. ..others get rid of you (Military) ...only to do only what they want...It's progress....isn't it???.....and it's catching
    Der!....

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 47.

    Pete Young unfortunately you have fallen for the rhetoric of the fascists. Thaksin was convicted by a kangaroo court of signing allowing his wife to buy property with her own money ( Thai law requires spousal approval to buy property)Two previous supreme court rulings had ruled the agency which sold the land was independent from government, Overturned by a coup installed group of judges!

  • rate this
    -8

    Comment number 46.

    Ms Yingluck is a very immature lady to be a prime minister. She moves her head and arms the way school girls do, and doesn't look like a responsible person. She is also very young.

  • rate this
    +4

    Comment number 45.

    yes the current Thaksin controlled Goverment keeps winning elections , thats because the poor who they claim to champion and vote them into power are hooked on handouts . These handout are designed to keep the poor poor and to be open to corruption.

  • rate this
    +3

    Comment number 44.

    Thailand is somewhat of a unique country. Its neighbors was never subject to colonial rule, has vehemently resisted communism and still worship its king as a god. Corruption is simply a way of life and the country would more than likely, due to the excessive bureaucracy, simply grind to a halt without it. You just can't compare it's people & its simplistic political system with that of the west.

  • Comment number 43.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 42.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • rate this
    +3

    Comment number 41.

    As a expat in thailand i find it amazing that a puppet of thaksin his sister yingluck is allowed to be prime minister, he is a wanted criminal who's followers the red shirt or rent a mob movement burned down the world trade centre in 2010 & 12 other plaza's & businesses all owned by families who Mr Thaksin has problems with. Thaksin is a dictator, like mugabe, or N. korean leader or Pol Pot.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 40.

    It appears from this article that the opposition are unhappy with the government and in order to prove this, they will resign and so cease to be an opposition, allowing the government to do exactly as it pleases.
    Monty Python is alive and well and practising politics in Thailand then.
    I wonder what it would take for the population of this planet to grow up?

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 39.

    Thailand needs a third party (with socialist leanings), as the current two are swamped with corruption.
    Be careful of UK Left-style fantasising that there is a 'middle class' you can target and be bigoted towards: it's not that simplistic. The yellows are lower-middle class, the reds are lower class (by education). The corrupt elite are high class and infect both sides. There is no middle class.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 38.

    Yinglucks is a puppet of a wanted criminal, the red shirt movement is a movement based on 1000 baht day payment to there followers mostly unemployed, true demonstrations & protestors do not need paid for loyalty, winning a election when you bribed the voters with a 20 billion rice scam to compensate farmers there main voters is hardly a fair election. Votes for dollars is not a fair election is it

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 37.

    What is the objective evidence, Mr Head, for the assertion that the current government will likely win an election? Are there any recent nationally representative polls that bear this out? Otherwise, it looks like pure speculation or political bias on your part.

  • Comment number 36.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • rate this
    -4

    Comment number 35.

    it is a shame our own MP's do not have the morals and guts to do this, and force hundreds of Bye-Elections.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 34.

    This isn't about red shirts vs. yellow shirts any more, it's about a corrupt red-shirt government vs. ordinary people who are sick of their government's efforts to get amnesty for the PM's corrupt brother who's free to come back to the country any time for his day in court. Resigning en-masse is a way of forcing the government's hand. The cult that is Thaksin is like a cancer in this country.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 33.

    There's a strong belief that it's fate that brings power and riches, and everyone wants and expects those who make it into power to help friends and families. Without a cultural shift, the corruption will continue and nothing will change.

  • Comment number 32.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • rate this
    -3

    Comment number 31.

    These Thais are a stupid bunch of people lead to street by few self serving and corrupted politicians. All those street protests in the past have not delivered anything positive, neither will this.

  • rate this
    -2

    Comment number 30.

    Are you listening London ?

 

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