Asia

Moving moments from Malala's BBC diary

Malala Yousufzai, a 14-year-old schoolgirl, who was wounded in a gun attack, is seen in Swat Valley, northwest Pakistan, Image copyright Reuters

Pakistani child education activist Malala Yousafzai has jointly won the Nobel Peace Prize, becoming its youngest ever recipient.

In 2009 she wrote a diary chronicling life under Taliban rule in Pakistan's north-western Swat valley. Three years later militants shot her in the head.

She survived and went on to be a global voice for education rights. These are some of the most affecting moments in the diary, which first appeared on BBC Urdu.

'I had a terrible dream'

Saturday 3 January

I had a terrible dream yesterday with military helicopters and the Taliban. I have had such dreams since the launch of the military operation in Swat. My mother made me breakfast and I went off to school. I was afraid going to school because the Taliban had issued an edict banning all girls from attending schools...

Image copyright AP
Image caption The Taliban was in de facto control of the Swat valley where Malala lived at the time she was writing the diary

On my way from school to home I heard a man saying 'I will kill you'. I hastened my pace and after a while I looked back if the man was still coming behind me. But to my utter relief he was talking on his mobile and must have been threatening someone else over the phone.

Thursday 15 Jan

Today is ... the last day before the Taliban's edict comes into effect, and my friend was discussing homework as if nothing out of the ordinary had happened.

Today, I also read the diary written for the BBC (in Urdu) and published in the newspaper. My mother liked my pen name 'Gul Makai' and said to my father 'why not change her name to Gul Makai?' I also like the name because my real name means 'grief stricken'.

Read all entries 3-15 January

'Some of my friends have left'

Friday 18 Jan

Image copyright EPA
Image caption Malala was shot by the Taliban aged just 14, this picture was taken shortly before that

My father told us that the government would protect our schools. The prime minister has also raised this issue. I was quite happy initially, but now I know but this will not solve our problem. Here in Swat we hear everyday that so many soldiers were killed and so many were kidnapped at such and such place. But the police are nowhere to be seen.

Thursday 22 Jan

Some of my friends have left Swat because the situation here is very dangerous. I do not leave home. At night Maulana Shah Dauran [the Taleban cleric who announced the ban on girls attending school] once again warned females not to leave home. He also warned that they would blow up those schools which are used by the security forces as security posts.

Read all entries 18-22 January

'Dozens of schools have been destroyed'

Image copyright AFP
Image caption The Taliban set about blowing up schools in north-west Pakistan

Saturday 25 January

It seems that it is only when dozens of schools have been destroyed and hundreds others closed down that the army thinks about protecting them. Had they conducted their operations here properly, this situation would not have arisen.

Wednesday 28 January

We are staying with our father's friend in Islamabad. It is my first visit to the city. It's beautiful with nice bungalows and wide roads. But as compared to my Swat city it lacks natural beauty...

Read all entries 24-28 January

'I am sad watching my uniform'

Saturday 7 February

There was no one else besides people with long hair and beards. From their appearance they looked like Taleban. I saw some houses damaged due to shelling.

Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption At the time there were protests in other parts of Pakistan condemning the destruction of schools

Sunday 8 February

I am sad watching my uniform, school bag and geometry box. I felt hurt on opening my wardrobe and seeing my uniform, school bag and geometry box. Boys' schools are opening tomorrow.

But the Taliban have banned girls' education.

Tuesday 19 February

I told my brothers that we will not talk of war but peace from now on. We received the information from our school headmistress that examinations will be held in the first week of March. I have stepped up my studies.

Read all entries 7-19 February

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