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BBC interview kids cartoon creator 'thrilled' at response

still from Mina and Jack cartoon Image copyright Hans House Productions

One of the people behind a new cartoon based on the children who interrupted a BBC interview has said he is "thrilled" at reaction to it.

Jarryd Mandy was especially delighted to have Prof Robert Kelly's blessing.

Prof Kelly became famous when his live TV interview was interrupted by his happy children, oblivious to the importance of the moment.

Mr Mandy and his partner Lauren Martin were so taken by the viral clip that they thought: "It can't stop here".

Their cartoon The Adventures of Mina and Jack features the two children (names in real life: Marion and James) trying to help their father out with his important UN jobs.

It is slightly removed from their real lives but the personality that shone through when Marion strutted in to the room is well-reflected.

"She's gregarious, she's cunning, she's a go-getter," Mr Mandy said.

She also wears the same big glasses and cheeky smile as Marion.

Her little brother is in his walker - of course.

There are several more episodes on the way and Mr Mandy is hoping to fill a series if they can get financial backing. They put their own money in to hiring an animation company for a pilot episode, which is already online.

He and Ms Martin approached Prof Kelly before making the cartoon, and are hoping to meet the children next month.

The professor - now also known as "BBC dad" all over the internet - gave his public approval to the cartoon on Twitter, where he acknowledged that many of his followers were there because of the children.

Image copyright @Robert_E_Kelly

Prof Kelly and his family live in South Korea while the couple live in the US.

Mr Mandy said his hope was that the cartoon would be educational. The first trip features a trip to North Africa; in future, he said, it would feature South Korea.

"We want them to bring exposure to different cultures," he said.

"You can really bring a character to life with a cartoon."

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Media captionThe moment when Prof Kelly's kids burst in

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