China's landslide death toll rises to 46 - state media

A number of people remain missing after the landslide struck on Friday

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At least 46 people, including children, are now known to have been killed by a landslide in China's southern Yunnan province, state media report.

The bodies of the last two missing residents of the Gaopo village, Yunnan province, were found in the morning, Xinhua news agency says.

The landslide hit the village at about 08:20 local time on Friday (23:00 GMT Thursday), burying 16 houses.

Map of Yunnan province

Hundreds of rescuers have been searching for survivors at the site.

Photos published on the news agency's website showed rescue workers combing through piles of earth and rubble strewn across a mountainous area.

Two injured people were earlier sent to hospital but their condition remains unknown.

The affected village, which is experiencing freezing temperatures, is next to Yiliang county, where a landslide in October buried a primary school that killed 18 children and an adult.

A series of earthquakes, including one of 5.8 magnitude, also hit the county in September 2012, killing dozens of people.

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