Senior Indian policeman removed over honour killing row

Satish Kumar Mathur Mr Mathur's comments have outraged India

Related Stories

A top police official in India who was caught on camera allegedly supporting honour killings has been removed from his position, reports say.

Satish Kumar Mathur was caught on camera advising a father to kill his daughter if reports that she had eloped were confirmed.

"If she was my sister, I would have either killed her or shot myself," he is overheard as saying.

Mr Mathur is a senior police officer in Uttar Pradesh state.

He was removed from his position as the most senior police officer in the Saharanpur region to another office.

The police officer's comments, shown on news television channels, caused outrage across India with the National Commission for Women calling for his suspension.

Mr Mathur's comments suggested that he believed that the girl had eloped, but the girl's father has insisted that she was kidnapped by two men.

Hundreds of people are killed each year in India by their families or relatives for falling in love or marrying against their families' wishes.

Last year, the Supreme Court advocated death penalty for those convicted in honour killing cases.

More on This Story

Related Stories

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites

More India stories

RSS

Features & Analysis

  • Cerro RicoSatanic mines

    Devil worship in the tunnels of the man-eating mountain


  • Nefertiti MenoeWar of words

    The woman who sparked a row over 'speaking white'


  • Oil pumpPump change

    What would ending the US oil export ban do to petrol prices?


  • Brazilian Scene, Ceara, in 1893Sir Snapshot

    19th Century Brazil seen through the eyes of an Englishman


Elsewhere on the BBC

  • SailingGame on

    BBC Capital discovers why certain sports seem to have a special appeal for those with deep pockets

Programmes

  • European Union's anti-terrorism chief Gilles de KerchoveHARDtalk Watch

    Anti-terrorism chief Gilles de Kerchove on the threat from returning Islamic State fighters

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.