India elections: How did big names do?

The BJP's supporters are celebrating their party's victory The BJP's supporters are celebrating their party's victory

India's general elections, described as the world's biggest democratic exercise, have come to a close with results showing a comfortable win for the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP).

Many of its top leaders, including prime ministerial candidate Narendra Modi, have won their seats.

But several leaders of the outgoing Congress party have lost. BBC Monitoring looks at how some of the big names in the 2014 general elections fared.

Who won their seats?

Narendra Modi

the BJP's Narendra Modi at an election rally Mr Modi led the BJP's campaign in the 2014 general elections

Mr Modi has won the constituency of Vadodara in the western state of Gujarat and also from Varanasi in the northern state of Uttar Pradesh. India's election law allows politicians to stand in two seats, but Mr Modi will now have to relinquish one of them.

Varanasi was one of the most talked-about constituencies because of the presence of Mr Modi and Aam Aadmi Party (AAP) leader Arvind Kejriwal.

LK Advani

Mr Advani, a founding member of the BJP, held Gandhinagar in Gujarat. The veteran leader first won the seat in 1991.

Rajnath Singh

The BJP president won Lucknow in Uttar Pradesh. The seat has a symbolic value for the party because it sent former PM Atal Bihari Vajpayee to parliament five times between 1991 and 2004.

Sonia Gandhi
Mrs Gandhi's Congress party has conceded defeat Mrs Gandhi's Congress party has conceded defeat

Despite her party being routed nationally, the Congress president retained her Rae Bareli constituency in Uttar Pradesh. Analysts say Mrs Gandhi's win is likely to be among the few bright moments for her party in the elections.

Rahul Gandhi
From left to right, Smriti Irani, Rahul Gandhi and Kumar Vishwas are locked in a three-way battle From left to right, Smriti Irani, Rahul Gandhi and Kumar Vishwas fought a three-way battle in Amethi

The Congress vice-president failed to inspire India's voters but he did manage to hold the Gandhi-Nehru stronghold of Amethi in Uttar Pradesh. Mr Gandhi, who has been the face of his party's campaign and won the seat in 2004 and 2009 with huge margins, secured victory against the BJP's Smriti Irani and the AAP's Kumar Vishwas - but with a narrower lead.

Shashi Tharoor

The Congress minister retained his Trivandrum seat in the southern state of Kerala against the BJP veteran O Rajagopal and the Left's Bennet Abraham.

Kirron Kher

The BJP's actor-turned-politician won in Chandigarh, defeating fellow actor and AAP candidate Gul Panag and the Congress party's Pawan Bansal.

Hema Malini

The Bollywood actress secured a comfortable victory in Mathura in Uttar Pradesh against the regional Bahujan Samaj Party's Yogesh Dwivedi.

... and who lost?

Kapil Sibal
From left to right, Ashutosh, Harsh Vardhan and Kapil Sibal say their party will win the general election Harsh Vardhan (centre) beat Ashutosh (left) and Kapil Sibal in Delhi's Chandni Chowk

A minister in the outgoing government, the Congress leader lost his Chandni Chowk seat to the BJP's Harsh Vardhan. The AAP's Ashutosh came second, leaving Mr Sibal in the third spot. This was one of the eagerly watched seats because of the three-way contest. Harsh Vardhan, the winning candidate, was the BJP's chief ministerial candidate in last year's Delhi state elections.

Nandan Nilekani

The Congress party's billionaire candidate from Bangalore South lost against the BJP's Ananth Kumar, former federal minister.

Mr Nilekani is the former head of Indian IT giant Infosys and is credited with making the firm a "great success story" with his colleagues. The billionaire quit Infosys in 2009 to head the federal government's ambitious project to provide a unique identification number to half of India's billion-plus people and joined the Congress party earlier in the year.

Salman Khurshid

The federal minister lost his Farrukhabad seat in Uttar Pradesh. The two-time MP was beaten by regional Samajwadi Party candidate Rameshwar Singh.

Arvind Kejriwal
Arvind Kejriwal's AAP contested on more than 400 seats Arvind Kejriwal's AAP contested more than 400 seats

The AAP leader lost his debut parliamentary election against Mr Modi in Varanasi. He had pledged to fight against Mr Modi even before polling dates were announced. Mr Kejriwal and his party will now look to assess their strategy after a humbling defeat in their first general election.

Arun Jaitley
The BJP's Arun Jaitley is taking on the Congress' Amarinder Singh The BJP's Arun Jaitley (left) lost to the Congress party's Amarinder Singh

The senior BJP leader lost to the Congress party's Amarinder Singh in Amritsar, Punjab. The seat was won by the BJP's Navjot Singh Sidhu in the 2009 general elections.

Farooq Abdullah

The leader of the regional National Conference lost in Srinagar in Indian-administered Kashmir. Mr Abdullah was a federal minister and alliance partner of the Congress party.

BBC Monitoring reports and analyses news from TV, radio, web and print media around the world. For more reports from BBC Monitoring, click here. You can follow BBC Monitoring on Twitter and Facebook.

More on This Story

India elections

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites

More India stories

RSS

Features & Analysis

  • Martin Gardner as a young manThink hard

    Was this man the world's greatest puzzle master?


  • Carved pumpkinTrick or treat

    What did a riot at a pumpkin festival show about race in US?


  • A woman puts on a surgical mask during hospital Ebola training in Alabama.'Dark continent'

    Is prejudice fuelling Ebola outbreak hysteria in the US?


  • Oscar de la Renta and Oprah WinfreyIn pictures

    The life and work of Oscar de la Renta


Elsewhere on the BBC

  • FutureThe future is now

    Get the latest updates and biggest ideas from BBC Future’s World-Changing Ideas Summit

Programmes

  • Smart glassesClick Watch

    Smart spectacles go into battle – the prototypes looking to take on Google Glass

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.