Australia

Frank Gehry's 'brown paper bag' opens in Sydney

A front view of the Chau Chak Wing Business School in Sydney Image copyright Andrew Worssam
Image caption The Frank Gehry-designed Chau Chak Wing building is home to the UTS Business School.

Sydney has joined the list of cities with a Frank Gehry-designed building.

The Chau Chak Wing Business School building has been dubbed the "brown paper bag" by local media.

Speaking at Monday's opening, Mr Gehry said he hoped the building would generate a "spirit of invention".

The A$180m ($140m; £93m) building for the Business School for the University of Technology, Sydney (UTS), is named after businessman and philanthropist Dr Chau Chak Wing.

It is the architect's first design to be built in Australia.

Mr Gehry said he had designed a "flexible" building with only a few fixed parts, allowing the building to be changed over time to meet the changing needs of its users.

"People will invent ways to use it," he said

Gehry said that five years after its conception, there were perhaps some things he would change but he was pleased with the finished result.

"I am Jewish and I feel guilty about everything," he joked.

The building - tucked between several small streets in the inner city suburb of Ultimo in Sydney - is a key part of the university's campus master plan. It will house 1,630 students and staff for the UTS Business School.

Image copyright Andrew Worssam
Image caption The Chau Chak Wing building’s facade curves and folds like fabric.
Image copyright Sahlan Hayes
Image caption In 2010, Frank Gehry was commissioned to design a new business school for UTS.
Image copyright Sahlan Hayes
Image caption Undulating brickwork and large glass panels have created a “curtain wall”.
Image copyright Sahlan Hayes
Image caption The building makes prominent use of stairways, including a polished stainless steel staircase rising up from the main lobby.
Image copyright Sahlan Hayes
Image caption Two oval classrooms have been constructed around 150 large laminated timber beams, each weighing up to two tonnes.

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