Europe

Dutch FC Twente stadium roof collapse kills workers

The roof of FC Twente's stadium in Enschede after it collapsed
Image caption FC Twente was expanding the stadium before the start of next season

Part of a stadium roof has collapsed in the Dutch city of Enschede, killing two people and injuring more than a dozen.

The accident happened during building work at the ground of top Dutch football team FC Twente. The victims are all construction workers.

The roof fell on top of a bank of seats behind one of the goals - Dutch media say two girders had buckled.

"It collapsed with a huge noise like a house of cards," a witness told the Dutch news agency ANP.

Firefighters and police helicopters were at the scene shortly after Thursday's collapse. Rescue workers had to free people from the rubble.

Peter den Oudsten, mayor of Enschede, said that one person had been killed outright, 10 others were taken to hospital and three were treated at the scene.

Sniffer dogs were used to check if anybody else was still trapped, he said.

One of those injured died in hospital on Friday, officials said.

No match was being played at the time of the collapse. The stadium - called Grolsch Veste - is being expanded to accommodate 32,000 fans ahead of the autumn season.

Mr Den Oudsten said it was not clear what had caused the accident.

Media playback is unsupported on your device
Media captionLatest video of the collapsed roof with commentary from Siebe Brinkhof

However, local media said a crane had driven into the stand.

The club's chairman Joop Munsterman is thought to have left the team's pre-season training camp in Zeeland to return to Enschede.

Club director Jan van Halst said the club "is terribly upset. Our sympathy goes to the victims".

FC Twente are one of the top teams in the Netherlands. In 2010 they won the League One title, and last year came second.

They are playing in the qualifying round of next season's European Champions League and were scheduled to host a match at the Grolsch Veste stadium at the end of July or the beginning of August.

Related Internet links

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites