Europe

Turkey: Van quake rescuers find more bodies in rubble

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Media captionDramatic CCTV footage has emerged of the moment a 5.6-magnitude earthquake struck the city of Van on Wednesday

Rescuers in Turkey have recovered more bodies from collapsed buildings in the eastern city of Van, following an earthquake late on Wednesday.

At least 13 people are now known to have been killed but more people are missing under the rubble.

Emergency teams are still digging through debris looking for survivors.

Many people who had stayed in their homes after a previous quake last month are now seeking shelter, creating a huge demand for temporary housing.

The earlier quake in the Van region on 23 October killed about 600 people.

Twenty-five buildings in Van collapsed in Wednesday's 5.6 magnitude tremor, including two hotels where many aid workers and journalists were staying.

However, most of the properties were empty, having been evacuated following the October earthquake.

A Japanese doctor, Atsushi Miyazaki, who had travelled to help survivors of that disaster was among those who died in Van.

He was staying at the Bayram Hotel in the city with a colleague, who was pulled alive from the rubble.

Rescuers are now using the hotel's emergency evacuation plans to try to pick their way through the debris to where people might be.

"We are not able to hear any voices," a disaster management official, Askit Dayi, told the AP news agency.

"But still we are removing layers of concrete as if there are survivors."

"We hope to finish the search by midnight on Friday," he said.

Relatives of missing people waited near the collapsed hotels through the night, huddled around fires to stay warm.

Unsafe buildings

Although this quake was smaller, it has exposed the fragility of many remaining buildings in Van, says the BBC correspondent in Turkey, Jonathan Head.

People in Van protested on Thursday about the response of the authorities to this quake and the earlier one.

Residents accused officials of having failed to warn about particularly unsafe buildings following the October quake.

The demonstrators clashed with police who tried to break-up the protest.

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