Estonia country profile

Map of Estonia

Estonia is the most northerly of the three Baltic republics, while having linguistic ties with Finland.

Since regaining its independence with the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, Estonia has become of the most economically successful of the EU's new eastern European members.

History

Ruled at various times during the middle ages by Denmark, the German knights of the Livonian Order and Sweden, Estonia ended up part of the Russian Empire in the 18th century.

It experienced its first period of independence in 1918, following the end of World I and the collapse of the Russian Empire.

Medieval walls of Tallinn

At a glance

  • Politics: Since regaining independence in 1991, Estonia has been a stable democracy run by varying centre-right-dominated coalitions; There is a large Russian-speaking minority.
  • Economy: Estonia has experienced rapid growth. Key sectors include manufacturing and IT. Estonia joined the eurozone in 2011
  • International: Estonia joined Nato and the EU in 2004. It has a troop contingent in Afghanistan

Country profiles compiled by BBC Monitoring

But the new state, which underwent periods of both democratic and authoritarian rule, was short-lived.

After only 20 years, Estonia was forcefully incorporated into Soviet Union in 1940, following a pact between Hitler and Stalin. German troops occupied Estonia during World War II, before being driven out by the Soviet army.

Few nations formally recognised the Soviet annexation, and Estonians consider it an illegal occupation.

One of its legacies is a large Russian minority - about a quarter of the population, according to the 2011 census. In Soviet times, the influx of non-Estonians led some to fear for the survival of Estonian culture and language.

The Russians' status has been a cause for controversy. Some, including the Russian government, criticise requirements needed to obtain Estonian citizenship - especially the need to show a proficiency in the Estonian language - that left most ethnic Russians stateless after independence.

Estonia says the criteria for citizenship are similar to those of most nations around the world, and have been in any case gradually eased. It says the number of stateless persons has dropped by 80% between 1992 and 2013.

Since independence, Estonia has politically and economically anchored itself firmly in the West, joining the EU in 2004 and Nato in the same year. It send a contingent of troops as part of Nato operations in Afghanistan.

Economy

Estonian governments have tended to pursue strongly free-market economic policies, privatising state enterprises, introducing a flat-rate income tax, liberalising regulation, encouraging free trade and and keeping public debt low.

There has also been a strong emphasis rapid on making Estonia a world leader in technology, leading some to speak of an "e-economy".

This has included creating one of the world's fastest broadband networks, offering widespread free wireless internet, encouraging technology start-ups and putting government services online. In 2007, Estonia was the first country to allow online voting in a general election.

The country experienced an investment boom in the early 2000s, especially after EU membership, with high annual growth hovering between 7-10%.

In 2008, Estonia's economy was hit by the global financial crisis. The government adopted tough austerity measures and won plaudits for getting the economy back into shape.

The country joined the European single currency in January 2011.

Culture

The Estonian language is closely related to Finnish and - more distantly - Hungarian, but not to the Indo-European languages of either of the other Baltic republics, Latvia and Lithuania, or Russian.

The country has unique musical and dance traditions, including a long tradition of choral singing.

Tallin's historic old town Tallinn's historic old town is included in Unesco's World Heritage List

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