Jersey

Channel Islands stage annual air displays

Lancasters fly over Elizabeth Castle
Image caption Two Lancasters fly low over St Aubin bay in Jersey

The Battle of Britain Memorial Flight has thrilled spectators at the Guernsey and Jersey air displays.

Thousands lined Guernsey's east coast in the morning while crowds packed Jersey's Esplanade in the afternoon.

The stars of both shows were two Lancaster bombers, together with a Spitfire fighter and the Red Arrows.

Jersey has held an annual air display for more than 60 years, while Guernsey has staged its event for more than four decades.

Image caption Spectators lined the Esplanade to watch a range of old and new aircraft perform over St Aubin bay
Image caption The stars of the show were the rarely seen together pair of Lancasters
Image caption Commentators urged the crowds to wave at the pilots
Image caption Some spectators in Guernsey had an elevated view of the Red Arrows' flypast
Image caption Jersey Airport firefighters enjoyed the display while showing off their fire tender
Image caption The Red Arrows gave the final performances at both displays
Image caption Jersey's field squadron had a display on the Esplanade, although some members had their eyes on the sky
Image caption Other fliers also had smoke trail displays
Image caption A young aeroplane fan looks forward to seeing the Red Arrows

The only remaining British Lancaster still in operation flew at both air shows, accompanied by the world's only other flying Lancaster, which is usually based in Canada.

Don Schofield from the Royal Canadian Air Force said: "The big emphasis was getting together for what we think will be the last time in history. It may happen again, but we really don't know."

A number of aircraft attending have celebrated significant anniversaries, including the Red Arrows which are marking 50 years of formation flying.

The Jet Provost aircraft on display is celebrating its 60th anniversary and was flying in Guernsey for second time this year.

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