Isle Of Man / Ellan Vannin

Victoria Cross winner Major Robert Cain in Isle of Man bridge honour

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Media captionMajor Robert Cain was awarded the highest military decoration for "superb gallantry" after fighting for nine days at Arnhem in World War Two

A bridge in Castletown has been renamed in honour of the Isle of Man's only Victoria Cross winner.

Major Robert Cain was awarded the highest military decoration for "superb gallantry" after fighting for nine days at Arnhem in World War Two.

Bob Quayle, the last remaining Manx Arnhem veteran, said Major Cain was an "inspirational leader" who had a reputation for destroying enemy tanks.

The Cain bridge was unveiled by his daughter, Frances Clarkson.

Mr Quayle, 92, said: "Major Cain was a wonderful man [whom] the men would follow anywhere.

Image caption The bridge name was unveiled by Major Cain's daughter, Frances

"I was talking to a corporal who said there is a 'mad barmpot Major' up the road taking on tanks with a two-inch mortar. That 'barmpot' turned out to be Major Cain."

The Battle at Arnhem was part of Operation Market Garden, a massive airborne military operation launched to clear the way for an Allied advance into northern Germany.

Of an airborne force of more than 10,000, only 2,400 were successfully withdrawn on the night of the 25 September.

Andrew Burden of the Manx Aviation and Military Museum has helped to create a permanent exhibition to the Major.

Image caption The last remaining Manx Arnhem veteran, Bob Quayle, said Major Cain was a leader

"He fought for nine days consecutively and was always at the forefront of the battle and encouraging his men forward.

"He was wounded, temporarily blinded, had perforated ear drums from firing weapons but was still at the front with his men and that is why he was awarded the highest honour."

Major Cain's daughter, Frances Clarkson, said: "Its been a very special day.

"It's lovely to see my father remembered in this way. I am sure he would be very honoured and touched. He might have been a little overwhelmed by the whole thing.

"I think he would be surprised by all the excitement".

The permanent display can be seen at the Manx Aviation and Military Museum.

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