Jersey referendum result to be voted on by States

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A move for electoral reform of the States of Jersey will be debated by politicians next week.

In a referendum, held in April, islanders voted for a reduction in the number of politicians from 51 to 42, with 30 deputies elected from six equal districts and 12 parish constables.

The result was not binding and the States will vote on the proposal, including some suggested changes.

These include extra representatives for the two St Helier districts.

Deputy Trevor Pitman would like to see seven deputies for St Helier district one and seven for St Helier district two, rather than original five, to take the total number of deputies to 34.

Referendum Options

  • Option A involved 42 deputies elected, seven each from six equal electoral districts
  • Option B was 30 deputies elected, five from each of six districts and 12 parish constables elected from each parish
  • Option C called for the status quo of agreed change of eight senators elected island wide and 29 deputies and 12 parish constables elected from the 12 parishes

While Deputy Andrew Green wants to create a seventh district, St Helier district three, to give the island's capital and most heavily populated parish increased representation.

He said the move approved in the referendum "significantly disadvantages the voters of St Helier".

Mr Pitman agreed and said his proposal would offset the "clear deficit faced by St Helier residents".

He said: "It is still not a perfect system but definitely much fairer than the system proposed."

About a third of Jersey's 99,000 population lives in St Helier.

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