Peru profile

President: Ollanta Humala

Peruvian President Humala Ollanta Humala comes from a family of prominent radicals

Ollanta Humala, a career army officer, won the June 2011 presidential election after promising to respect democracy and spread the benefits of a decade-long economic boom to the poor.

He narrowly beat Keiko Fujimori, the daughter of jailed former President Alberto Fujimori.

As Mr Humala emerged as victor in the polls, financial markets plunged on fears that he would ruin the economy.

Mr Humala, 48 at the time of his election, burst onto the political scene in 2000 when he led a short-lived bloodless revolt to demand that former President Fujimori resign after 10 years in power. In the 1990s, he fought in the jungle against Shining Path guerrillas.

Uprising

He comes from a family of prominent radicals. His brother, Antauro Humala, led a failed uprising in 2005 against former President Alejandro Toledo's government and was jailed for the violent protest that killed four police officers.

His father, Isaac Humala, is a central figure in an ethnic movement that seeks to reclaim Peru's Incan glory by spurning foreign interests.

In 2006, Humala narrowly lost the presidential election to Alan Garcia. He campaigned in a red polo shirt and called for a dramatic transformation in the style of Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez's declared "socialist revolution".

Since then he has recast himself as a family man. He has softened his radical image and disavowed his affinity for Mr Chavez.

He promises Peru's poor a greater share of the country's considerable mineral wealth and pledged to honour the free market but put Peruvians first.

Prime Minister: Raul Cornejo

Peruvian President Humala, left, and prime minister Villanueva President Humala, left, and former prime minister Cesar Villanueva

Peru is unusual among South American countries in having the post of prime minister.

President Humala appointed Raul Cornejo as his fifth prime minister in a cabinet reshuffle in February 2014.

Mr Cornejo is one of the president's longest-serving cabinet ministers and is widely viewed as having close ties with Mr Humala and his wife, Nadine Heredia, who is a leading adviser to her husband and a co-founder of the governing Gana Peru party.

Mr Cornejo's predecessor, Cesar Villanueva, stepped down after a public dispute with the first lady and the country's finance minister over a bid to raise the minimum wage.

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