United States returns to Peru last Machu Picchu artefacts

Machu Picchu Machu Picchu is the main tourist attraction in Peru, but there are concerns over the high number of visitors to the Andean citadel

Related Stories

The last of the artefacts taken from Machu Picchu by American archaeologist who rediscovered the Inca citadel have been returned to Peru.

More than 35,000 pottery fragments and other pieces were flown from Yale University to the Andean city of Cusco.

They had been taken to the US by archaeologist Hiram Bingham, who brought the site to international attention in 1911.

The move completes a deal signed in 2010, following legal action by Peru.

It argued that Bingham had only been loaned the artefacts.

The American archaeologist and historian took to Yale some 46,000 ceramics, bone fragments and metal pieces.

The first and second lots of artefacts arrived back in Peru last year.

The best pieces will now be on display in a newly built museum in nearby Cusco.

The citadel of Machu Picchu, located 2,500m (8,200ft) above sea level, was built in the 15th Century by the Incas.

It is Peru's main tourist attraction, attracting more than 1 million visitors a year.

More on This Story

Related Stories

More Latin America & Caribbean stories

RSS

Features & Analysis

  • Cartoon of women chatting on the metroChat wagon

    The interesting things you hear in a women-only carriage


  • Replica of a cargo boxSpecial delivery

    The man who posted himself to the other side of the world


  • Music scoreFinal score Watch

    Goodbye to NYC's last classical sheet music shop


  • Former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton checks her Blackberry from a desk inside a C-17 military plane upon her departure from Malta, in the Mediterranean Sea, bound for Tripoli, Libya'Emailgate'

    Hillary gets a taste of scrutiny that lies ahead


Elsewhere on the BBC

  • Audi R8Best in show

    BBC Autos takes a look at 10 of the most eye-catching new cars at the 2015 Geneva motor show

Programmes

  • A robotClick Watch

    The latest in robotics including software that can design electronics to solve problems

Try our new site and tell us what you think. Learn more
Take me there

Copyright © 2015 BBC. The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.