Oscar Niemeyer: Brazil bids final farewell to architect

Oscar Niemeyer's coffin being taken from the presidential palace in Brasilia (7 Dec) Mr Niemeyer's coffin was taken to Rio from the presidential palace in Brasilia, one of the buildings he designed

Related Stories

Thousands of Brazilians have paid their final respects to the renowned architect Oscar Niemeyer, who died on Wednesday at the age of 104.

Mourners filed past his coffin in the capital Brasilia and later in Rio de Janeiro where the funeral took place.

Flowers were sent by admirers around the world including the Cuban leader Raul Castro and his brother, Fidel.

Mr Niemeyer achieved fame as the architect of government buildings in Brasilia, inaugurated in 1960.

On Friday, his coffin lay covered with the Brazilian flag and three red roses in Rio's City Hall as mourners filed past.

Oscar Niemeyer's funeral cortege arrives at Planalto Palace in Brasilia. 6 December 2012

It had been flown there from Brasilia where it had lain in the Planalto presidential palace - a building he had designed.

At the Sao Joao Batista Cemetery in Rio, mourners followed the funeral cortege through the front gates.

Some prayed and sang hymns while others waved the communist party flag - the architect was a firm communist and atheist.

A samba group played during the interment.

Oscar Niemeyer started his career in the 1930s and his bold futuristic designs in Brasilia made the new capital an icon of modern architecture.

Mr Niemeyer also worked with Swiss-born modernist architect Le Corbusier on the UN building in New York.

More on This Story

Related Stories

More Latin America & Caribbean stories

RSS

Features & Analysis

Elsewhere on the BBC

  • MouseEscape the rat race

    Burnt out? Meet the workers who took more than a vacation - and changed their lives

Programmes

  • (File photo) A man dressed as Father Christmas with a sleigh and a reindeer Click Watch

    A website which tracks Father Christmas, plus other sites and apps to keep you entertained

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.