Egypt's ousted President Morsi 'abducted by army'

Mr Morsi's son Osama spoke of his anger at his father's "kidnapping"

The family of the ousted Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi has accused the army of abducting him.

His daughter Shaimaa told a news conference in Cairo that the family was taking legal measures against the army.

Mr Morsi has been held at an undisclosed location without charge since he was removed from power on 3 July.

At least three people were killed in clashes on Monday between opponents and supporters of the former president.

Mr Morsi's Muslim Brotherhood movement has refused to recognise the new military-backed administration and continues to hold almost daily street protests.

One person died and dozens of protesters were wounded during unrest in central Cairo, medical officials said. Egyptian state TV reported that seven pro-Morsi protesters had been arrested for possession of illegal weapons.

At least two more people were reported killed in separate clashes in Qalyubiya province, north of Cairo.

'Abduction' denounced

The statement from Mr Morsi's family - the first since he was deposed from office - said it held the military responsible for the former leader's "safety and security".

"We are taking local and international legal measures against Abdul Fattah al-Sisi, the leader of the bloody military coup, and his putschist group," Shaimaa Morsi told reporters.

The family was appealing to the International Criminal Court to launch an investigation into the events leading up to his removal from power, she said.

One of Mr Morsi's sons, Osama, said: "What is going on is a violation of human rights and a scandal in every sense of the word."

He described the manner in which the military were holding Mr Morsi as an "abduction".

A portrait of ousted Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi is seen behind barbed wire during a demonstration by Morsi's supporters in Cairo, Egypt, Sunday, July 21, 2013. Mr Morsi has not been seen in public since 3 July

The family had had no contact with the former president since he was ousted, he said.

Mohammed al-Damati, a leading Egyptian lawyer and supporter of Mr Morsi, said it was a breach of the former president's human rights to hold him without charge.

Several countries, including the United States, have called for Mr Morsi's release.

But Egypt's interim authorities insist he is being held in a "safe place".

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