Middle East

Video reports: Arab uprising three years on

Three years ago Tunisian vegetable seller Muhammad Bouazizi set himself on fire. His death sparked a wave of protests across the Arab world. To coincide with the third anniversary of Mr Bouazizi's self-immolation, BBC News returned to the countries affected by the uprisings.

Surge in Arab sectarian violence

One of the dominant issues to emerge in three years of Arab uprisings across the Middle East has been the divide between Sunni and Shia Muslims, as Jeremy Bowen reports from Lebanon.

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Media captionIraq, Bahrain and Lebanon, among other countries, have have witnessed a surge in sectarian-related violence

Fresh concern over Egyptian freedom

As concerns grows about a fresh crackdown on dissent, Orla Guerin reports from Tahrir Square, birthplace of the Egyptian revolution.

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Media captionSupporters of coup hero, Gen Abdul Fattah al-Sisi, want him to stand for the presidency

Yemen: 'Life is harder than it was'

Shaimaa Khalil reports from the Yemeni capital of Sana'a to find out what has changed in the country since the uprising three years ago.

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Media captionEditor-in-chief of Yemen Times, Nadia Sakkaf: "Life is difficult in Yemen"

Syria: 'Bread has become a weapon of war'

Lyse Doucet visits a government bakery in Syria - one of the few places in the country still supplying affordable bread.

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Media captionLyse Doucet: "Even bread - the denial of bread - has become a weapon of war"

Tunisian rapper: 'What have we gained?'

Rapper Mohamed Amine Hamzaoui told BBC News he was happy that his country had sparked the flames of revolution, but he did not see that much had changed.

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Media captionTunisian rapper feels little has changed

Other mixed opinions from across the region

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Media captionPeople from Yemen, Egypt and Sudan give their view on whether or not the uprisings were successful