US & Canada

US man dies after being 'pushed in front of train'

US police are searching for a woman alleged to have pushed a passenger in front of an oncoming train in New York.

Eyewitnesses said the man was standing on a platform at the subway station in Queens when a woman rose from a bench and shoved him onto the tracks.

In December, a homeless man was charged with murder for pushing a passenger to his death in the Times Square subway.

The incident caused an outcry after a tabloid published a photo showing the victim moments away from being struck.

On Friday, police identified the victim as 46-year-old Sunando Sen, originally from India and a resident of Queens.

Investigators identified Sen through a smart phone and a prescription pill bottle he was carrying.

No surveillance footage

Thursday's incident took place at the 40th Street-Lowery Street subway station near Queens Boulevard in the Sunnyside neighbourhood of the borough of Queens in New York City.

Witnesses said that moments before the attack the female assailant was talking to herself while walking up and down the platform, before eventually sitting down on a bench.

Image caption Naeem Davis faces murder charges for allegedly pushing a man in front of a train in early December

As the train approached, the suspect rose from her seat and pushed Sen, who stood with his back to her, onto the tracks, Deputy Commissioner Paul Brown said in a statement.

The man's body was pinned under the front of a carriage as the train came to a halt.

The woman then fled the scene. It is unclear whether she knew her victim.

Police released a grainy, black-and-white video of a woman thought to be the assailant running down Queens Boulevard.

She was described by police as Hispanic, in her 20s, and "heavy-set".

They said she was approximately 5ft 5in (165cm) tall with blonde or brown hair, and was wearing a blue, white and grey ski jacket and Nike trainers.

In the last fatal subway push, on 3 December, Ki-Suck Han was shoved by Naeem Davis onto the track at 49th Street station near Times Square.

Freelance photographer R Umar Abbasi, who had been waiting on the platform, was criticised for taking pictures of the victim instead of trying to help.

Mr Abbasi said he was trying to get the train driver's attention with his camera flash.

The New York Post tabloid also came under fire over its decision to publish the image.

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