Planes in 'near-miss' collision over New York City

The empty Delta airlines terminal 3 at JFK airport is seen 24 May 2013 JFK (pictured) and LaGuardia, New York City's main airports, are about 10 miles apart

US aviation officials are investigating a near-collision between two jets in the skies over New York City.

On 13 June, a Delta Airlines Boeing 747 and a Shuttle America Embraer E170 came within 200ft (60m) vertically and half a mile (800m) horizontally from one another, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) said.

Both planes landed safely.

US aviation regulations require planes to be 1000ft apart vertically or three miles horizontally.

About 14:40 local time on 13 June, the Delta plane was cleared to land at John F Kennedy (JFK) International Airport, but the pilot decided not to land, a standard procedure known as a "missed approach".

Meanwhile, the Shuttle America plane was departing from LaGuardia Airport about 10 miles (16km) away.

The planes were "turning away from each other at the point where they lost the required separation", the FAA said in a statement.

The FAA did not say how many people were aboard either plane.

The Shuttle America Embraer E170 can hold 69 passengers and the Delta Boeing 747 can hold 376.

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