US adoptive parents convicted of Ethiopian girl's death

Carri Williams after she was found guilty in Mount Vernon, Washington, on 9 September 2013 Carri Williams was convicted of the most serious charges

Related Stories

A US couple has been convicted of the manslaughter of a teenage girl they adopted from Ethiopia.

Larry and Carri Williams, of Washington state, starved and beat Hana Williams until she died in the backyard of their home in May 2011.

They were also convicted of the first-degree assault of a younger boy they had adopted from Ethiopia.

Defence lawyers conceded that the couple were bad parents, but argued that they were not criminals.

Hana's paperwork when she was adopted in 2008 indicated she would have been about 13 years old at the time of her death.

The husband and wife blamed each other throughout the trial, according to the Skagit Valley Herald.

She was found guilty of homicide by abuse and first-degree manslaughter.

He was convicted of manslaughter; the jury could not reach a verdict on homicide.

The couple, from the city of Sedro-Woolley, are expected to face a maximum life sentence.

Carri Williams after he was found guilty in Mount Vernon, Washington, on 9 September 2013 Larry Williams (centre) sat a few feet away from his wife during the trial

More on This Story

Related Stories

More US & Canada stories

RSS

Features & Analysis

  • Cerro RicoSatanic mines

    Devil worship in the tunnels of the man-eating mountain


  • Nefertiti MenoeWar of words

    The woman who sparked a row over 'speaking white'


  • Oil pumpPump change

    What would ending the US oil export ban do to petrol prices?


  • Brazilian Scene, Ceara, in 1893Sir Snapshot

    19th Century Brazil seen through the eyes of an Englishman


Elsewhere on the BBC

  • SailingGame on

    BBC Capital discovers why certain sports seem to have a special appeal for those with deep pockets

Programmes

  • European Union's anti-terrorism chief Gilles de KerchoveHARDtalk Watch

    Anti-terrorism chief Gilles de Kerchove on the threat from returning Islamic State fighters

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.