Ten pilot whales die and dozens more beached in Florida

The pod of whales are stranded off the Florida coast

Ten whales have died and as many as 30 more are stranded after a pod beached off Florida's Everglades National Park, US government officials have said.

The pilot whales were swimming in only 3ft (0.9m) of salt water at a remote beach on Tuesday.

Initial rescue efforts have been stymied because the water around the animals is too shallow for boats.

Scientists believe the whales may have become stranded during low tide and were unable to return to deeper water.

Away from home

"This scenario is very challenging because of where they are," Blair Mase, spokeswoman for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, told reporters.

"They are very out of their home range."

She said the pilot whales, part of the dolphin family, normally inhabit deep waters.

Ms Mase said that 25 people had joined the rescue effort.

If the non-endangered whales cannot be coaxed out of the shallow waters, they may be euthanised, she concluded.

Everglades National Park comprises much of the southern tip of the Florida peninsula.

More on This Story

More US & Canada stories

RSS

Features & Analysis

  • Prostitute in red light district in Seoul, South KoreaSex for soldiers

    How Korea helped prostitutes work near US military bases


  • LuckyDumped

    The rubbish collector left on the scrap heap as his city cleans up


  • A woman gets a Thanksgiving meal at a church in FergusonFamily fears

    Three generations in Ferguson share Thanksgiving reflections


  • Canada joins TwitterTweet North

    Canada's self-deprecating social media feed


Elsewhere on the BBC

  • UnderwaterHidden depths

    How do you explore the bottom of the ocean? BBC Future finds out

Programmes

  • All-inclusive holidaysThe Travel Show Watch

    With all-inclusive holidays seeing a resurgence are local trades missing out to big resorts?

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.