AN INSIGHT INTO THE FUTURE OF GLOBAL BUSINESS

Food

The question is, as our food evolves, can we learn to evolve with it?

Let’s face it mankind handles the world’s food supply pretty poorly. When it comes to what we eat, our production and distribution systems, as well as our consumption patterns are archaic and wasteful. If we’re to feed the planet in the...

The question is, as our food evolves, can we learn to evolve with it?

Let’s face it mankind handles the world’s food supply pretty poorly. When it comes to what we eat, our production and distribution systems, as well as our consumption patterns are archaic and wasteful. If we’re to feed the planet in the future we need a massive redesign.

We use too much energy, spoil too much food, take in too little nutrients and eat too many animal products, while many people are under or malnourished, others suffer from food-related diseases such as obesity and diabetes.

We’ve had the Green Revolution, upping global agricultural production, yet we're reaching limits. However, science and technology has only really been applied to the fringes of the food industry itself -- to texture, taste and to sell more products. It is only recently that it’s being used to answer some of the really fundamental questions associated with what we eat.

If it starts to tackle some of the difficult questions that our global food industry faces we could see a new revolution. Forget silicon-based start-ups, food-technology start-ups are all the rage. Venture capital firms, which invest heavily in early-stage technology companies, are investing in food right now.

A new approach is to use our food resources, particularly plants, in a much more sustainable and clever way, one that involves less greenhouse gas emissions, less water and fewer animals. The question is, as our food evolves, can we learn to evolve with it?
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