David Weir not ruling out competing at Rio Paralympics

Six-time Paralympic gold medallist David Weir says he is not ruling out competing at the Rio 2016 Games.

Weir, 33, who won four titles at London 2012 in the T54 5,000m, 1500m, 800m and marathon, became a father for the third time in October and only returned to full-time training last week.

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After what happened in London I didn't think I'd be even talking about Rio, but it is now in the back of my mind

David Weir

"I did say it [London] would be my last Games but now everything's gone and I'm back into training I've got that little urge," Weir told BBC Sport.

"I'll never say never about Rio."

He added: "After what happened in London I didn't think I'd be even talking about Rio, but it is now in the back of my mind."

Weir's coach Jenny Archer,  who first met the Londoner when he was eight and began coaching him before the 2004 Athens Paralympics, believes he still has plenty to offer.

"I think one or two people were a bit surprised by what he achieved in London and if you throw him a challenge he'll take it so I would never put it [Rio] past him," Archer told BBC Sport.

"We have to maintain the interest and there are new challenges for this year, but if we are going to go for Rio we will look to start building it up a bit next year."

Weir currently shares a record of six London Marathon victories with Baroness Tanni Grey-Thompson and says becoming the outright record holder is his target for 2013.

Next year, however, his attention will turn to the Glasgow Commonwealth Games.

Get to know the 'Weirwolf'

"I've never represented England in the Commonwealths and that's something I would really like to," continued the man dubbed the "Weirwolf" at the London Games.

"It's not too far away, it's another challenge for my CV and hopefully I can win a medal there."

Weir admits wheelchair athletes are fortunate to have access to a number of competitive races around the globe, but he is backing the concept of a World Grand Prix series mooted by the International Paralympic Committee [IPC] earlier this week.

"I think this is the right time to do it," said Weir.

"Hopefully they'll start doing some trial events this year and then build on from that, I think it's just a great idea to promote Paralympic sport after the London Games."