Andy Murray faces Benjamin Becker in Wimbledon first round

 

WIMBLEDON

  • Venue: All England Club, London
  • Date: 24 June - 7 July

Coverage: Live on BBC One, BBC Two, BBC HD Channel, red button, BBC Radio 5 live, plus 10 live streams available on the BBC Sport website, tablet, mobile and connected TV.

Britain's Andy Murray will face Germany's world number 95 Benjamin Becker in the first round of Wimbledon.

The world number two is in the same quarter of the draw as sixth seed Jo-Wilfried Tsonga, of France.

Singles draws for British players at Wimbledon

Andy Murray v Benjamin Becker

James Ward v Yen-Hsun Lu

Kyle Edmund v Jerzy Janowicz

Laura Robson v Maria Kirilenko

Heather Watson v Madison Keys

Johanna Konta v Jelena Jankovic

Elena Baltacha v Flavia Pennetta

Tara Moore v Kaia Kanepi

Anne Keothavong v Garbine Muguruza

Samantha Murray v Camila Giorgi

Murray, 26, avoided a possible quarter-final against Rafael Nadal, but could face the Spaniard or defending champion Roger Federer in the last four.

Nadal, seeded fifth after missing seven months of the last year through injury, may meet Federer in the quarter-finals.

Tradition dictates that reigning champion Federer will open play on Centre Court on Monday, meaning both Murray and Nadal will also be in action on a packed first day that includes Maria Sharapova and Victoria Azarenka.

In the women's draw, Serena Williams is on a career-best winning streak of 31 matches and is an overwhelming favourite to win a sixth singles title.

The American will play Luxembourg's Mandy Minella in the first round on Tuesday, while second seed Azarenka plays Portugal's Maria Joao Koehler on Monday.

British number one Laura Robson faces a tough task against world number 10 Maria Kirilenko on Tuesday, while Heather Watson takes on American rising star Madison Keys.

There is every chance Robson's match will be scheduled for a show court, and speaking earlier in the week the 19-year-old said: "I'm happy playing on any court against any player. I'm just happy to be playing at Wimbledon.

"I don't need a wildcard or anything like that, so I'm pretty happy with how things are going. Ideally I'd like to not face Serena first round, but you have to play whoever you get."

Johanna Konta is up against Serbia's former world number one Jelena Jankovic, Elena Baltacha plays Italian Flavia Pennetta, Anne Keothavong faces Spaniard Garbine Muguruza, Tara Moore meets Estonian Kaia Kanepi, and Samantha Murray takes on Italian Camila Giorgi.

There are 10 Britons in the singles draws, with 18-year-old wildcard Kyle Edmund likely to be the centre of much attention when he plays Poland's 24th seed Jerzy Janowicz.

Murray's days of sweating over the draw are long gone. He expects to have to beat the best to win a Slam and having Federer and Nadal in his half won't scare him at all.

Djokovic has avoided his three main rivals so, in theory, has the much easier draw but I expect his main challenges to come from Tommy Haas in round four, either Richard Gasquet or Tomas Berdych in the quarters and Juan Martin del Potro, who won their bronze medal match here at Wimbledon in the Olympics, in the semis.

So while Djokovic has the better draw in terms of being in Ferrer's half, I actually expect him to have some tougher matches than Murray in the first week and a half.

"It's Wimbledon, I'll play on any court," Edmund said ahead of the draw. "If I play on Centre Court it would be amazing, but the chance of getting support on an outside court is just as good, and I'll be ready to play on anything."

British number two James Ward has the potential prize of a second-round clash with Andy Murray, should the Londoner get past world number 74 Yen-Hsun Lu.

World number one Novak Djokovic, meanwhile, would avoid Murray, Federer and Nadal until the final, with fourth seed David Ferrer in his half of the draw.

Seven-time champion Federer plays Romania's Victor Hanescu on Monday, while Murray was handed a rematch with 32-year-old Becker, the man he beat on his way to victory at Queen's Club last week.

Murray, who lost in four sets to Federer in last year's final, played down the significance of the draw earlier in the week, saying in his BBC Sport column: "As a player you can't get too obsessed about the draw.

"If you want to win the biggest tournaments, you have to beat the best players in the world. It doesn't really matter where they are in the draw."

Nadal begins his campaign against Belgian Steve Darcis and, if results go in line with seedings, the 2008 and 2010 champion would have to beat Federer, Murray and Djokovic to win his third Wimbledon title.

Top seed Djokovic, the 2011 champion, will play Germany's Florian Mayer in his opening match on Tuesday.

Watch Andy Murray documentary clip