Dan Roan

BBC sports editor

The biggest stories dissected by the BBC's sports editor

About Dan

The BBC's sports editor, Dan covers both major events and... Read more about Dan Roan news stories, especially on TV news output.

He's reported from football's World Cup in South Africa, the Rugby World Cup in New Zealand, the 2012 Euro finals in Poland and Ukraine, and the London Olympics.

Dan led the BBC's news coverage of the controversial Bahrain F1 Grand Prix, and the John Terry trial, breaking the news of Terry's retirement from international football.

With an interest in the politics and business of sport, Dan has also presented Radio 5 live's Sportsweek programme, and fronted a special BBC1 documentary on Brazil's preparations ahead of the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics.

Previously Dan was both a politics and finance journalist at the BBC before becoming chief news reporter at Sky Sports News.


'Sport approaching a decisive moment'

Read full article on 'World sport - and the fight to ensure it is clean - is approaching a decisive moment'

Rio's momentous Games may finally be over, but there seems no end in sight to sport's great drugs scandal. The hacking of the World Anti-Doping Agency's computer system is just the latest twist in a saga that by now truly takes some believing.

First we were told that, rather than protect clean athletes, those at the very top of athletics covered up doping, and allegedly even extorted money from cheating Russians.

Michael Phelps

Phelps wanted more anti-doping tests

Read full article on Rio 2016: Michael Phelps wanted more anti-doping tests

Michael Phelps was among a group of 23 American swimmers who demanded more drugs testing in the run up to the Rio Olympics, the BBC has learned.

The Olympics' most decorated athlete signed a letter sent to the International Swimming Federation (Fina) in December.

The Olympic rings

'Olympics is still worth fighting for'

Read full article on Rio 2016: 'Olympics is still worth fighting for'

If ever sport needed its most illustrious event to provide some inspiration, escapism and relief from its various troubles, it is now.

With just three weeks until the start of the Rio Olympics, the focus should be firmly on the squad selections, the venues, the spectacular backdrop that the city will provide, the medal prospects, the glittering opening ceremony and the unique anticipation that usually accompanies the build-up to the Games, the first to be held in South America.

Roy Hodgson, Angel Villar Llona and Leonid Slutsky

'Hodgson, Russia & Uefa under pressure'

Read full article on Euro 2016: Pressure cranks up on Roy Hodgson, Russia & Uefa

Plenty of people are under serious pressure over the next 48 hours here in northern France.

Not least England manager Roy Hodgson, who desperately needs his team to secure a positive result against Wales in Lens on Thursday after the disappointment of failing to win their opening Euro 2016 game against Russia, despite dominating.

French soldiers patrol in front of the UEFA EURO 2016 fan zone in Nice, France

Beleaguered France needs a successful Euros

Read full article on Beleaguered France needs a successful Euros

If ever a country needed an event to be a success, it is France right now on the eve of Euro 2016.

Some 210 days after suicide bombers began a harrowing night of terror at the Stade de France stadium in Paris, an attack that eventually cost the lives of 130 people, the European Championship will get under way at the same venue on Friday, when the hosts take on Romania.

Russian and Olympic flags

How Russian athletes may compete at Rio

Read full article on Russia and Rio 2016: How the IOC is working up an Olympic compromise

It is seen as one of the biggest decisions sport has ever had to face. When the IAAF Council meets in Vienna on 17 June, the participation of athletes from one of the world's most powerful countries - Russia - at sport's greatest event, the Olympic Games, will be at stake.

Or will it? Even if Russia is not reinstated this month, many of its track and field stars could still appear in Rio.