David Bond

BBC sports editor

Insight into the big stories and issues from the BBC sports editor

About David

David was appointed BBC's sports editor in December 2009.... Read more about David Bond

In the summer of 2012 he fronted BBC News' coverage of the London Olympics as part of what he describes as "arguably the greatest job in sports journalism". That job sees him provide analysis and context to the major sports news stories and events across the BBC's news and sport services on TV, radio and online.

Previously, he was the Daily Telegraph's sport editor while he has also worked for the Evening Standard and Sunday Times.

Andy Murray Wimbledon champion in 2013

'An honour to witness a golden period of sport'

Read full article on 'An honour to witness a golden period of sport'

And so - after more than four years covering the biggest stories in sport - this is my final blog as the BBC's Sports Editor.

During that time it has been my enormous privilege to witness first hand some of the most memorable moments British sport has arguably ever seen. But, more than that, it has been my incredible good fortune to have reported them for BBC News.

Why Fifa boss Sepp Blatter is going nowhere

Read full article on Sepp Blatter: Why the Fifa president is going nowhere

For much of this week, a fleet of police outriders have been parked outside Sao Paulo's Grand Hyatt hotel, ready to escort Fifa's 78-year-old president Sepp Blatter to his next meeting.

Everywhere he goes, the leader of football's world governing body is accompanied by a group of men in dark suits and even darker glasses.

Will Qatar paper trail prove corruption?

Read full article on Qatar World Cup 2022: Will paper trail prove bribery and corruption?

Ever since Qatar won the race to stage the 2022 World Cup more than three years ago, football's world governing body Fifa has faced calls to re-run the contest.

Whether it's the heat in the summer, the treatment of migrant labourers or allegations of corruption in the bidding process, Qatar has been under siege from critics who say it should never have been chosen to host the tournament in the first place.

Qatar World Cup: £3m corruption claim

Read full article on Qatar World Cup: '£3m payments to officials' corruption claim

Fifa is facing fresh allegations of corruption over its controversial decision to award the 2022 World Cup to Qatar.

The Sunday Times has obtained millions of secret documents - emails, letters and bank transfers - which it alleges are proof that the disgraced Qatari football official Mohamed Bin Hammam made payments totalling US$5m (£3m) to football officials in return for their support for the Qatar bid.

Ashes whitewash appalling - ECB boss

Read full article on England's Ashes whitewash was appalling, says ECB chairman

England's 5-0 defeat in the 2013-14 Ashes was "appalling" and "unacceptable", the chairman of the England and Wales Cricket Board has told the BBC.

In a candid interview, Giles Clarke said the team had to move on from the furore surrounding the controversial decision to drop Kevin Pietersen and now had to focus on regaining its status as number one cricket nation in the world.

Vincent holds key for corruption investigations

Read full article on Cricket corruption: Lou Vincent holds key following leak

Until yesterday you would have been hard pushed to find too many people - even in his native New Zealand - who had heard of Lou Vincent.

A journeyman Twenty20 specialist, he retired from international cricket in 2007 after playing 23 Tests and 102 one-day internationals.

Dyke warns critics of bleak future

Read full article on FA Commission: Greg Dyke warns of bleak future if proposals fail

Football Association chairman Greg Dyke warns that failure to adopt his plans to improve English football could lead to a bleak future for homegrown talent.

Dyke's proposals, which include a new tier within the Football League to accommodate Premier League B teams, have provoked lots of criticism.

FA's four-point plan: Views and opinions

Read full article on FA commission: Four-point plan splits football opinion

A Football Association commission has announced four key recommendations to boost English football's fortunes at club and international level.

At the heart of the plan is the creation of a new tier within the Football League to accommodate Premier League B teams.

England's shortcomings: Why debate is timely

Read full article on FA commission: State of English game right to be debated

This is the first time I can remember an inquest being held into the shortcomings of English football before a ball has been kicked at a World Cup.

But Football Association chairman Greg Dyke is trying to get on the front foot early, sensing perhaps that Roy Hodgson's England team are unlikely to cause an upset in Brazil this summer.