David Millar hits out at delay over Contador doping

Media playback is not supported on this device

Doping regulations are medieval - David Millar

British cyclist David Millar says it is bad for the sport that the controversy over Alberto Contador's positive drugs test has gone on for so long.

Three-time Tour de France champion Contador's hearing on a doping charge has been postponed until after the Tour in July, where he will compete.

"It's farcical," said Millar, who was banned from cycling from 2004-06 for taking the illegal blood booster EPO.

"He should have either been vindicated or sanctioned a long time ago."

Contador was banned for one year by the Spanish National Cycling Federation (RFEC) for testing positive for Clenbuterol during last summer's Tour before the body later acquitted the star of the charge.

Cycling's governing body, the UCI, and Wada are challenging RFEC's decision in the Court of Arbitration for Sport, but the hearing has been delayed until 1 August, paving the way for the 28-year-old to defend his Tour de France crown next month.

Contador returned to cycling in February and won the Giro d'Italia for the second time in May.

Millar, speaking at the launch of his autobiography 'Racing Through The Dark', added: "I think it's bad for Alberto and it's bad for the sport that it hasn't been sorted out yet.

"Whether he's positive or negative, it's the system's fault for not dealing with it. There should be a two-week timeframe for when it is actually resolved.

"This case is opening everyone's eyes to the discrepancies we have regards the sanctioning and disciplinary process in the anti-doping world. The science is now so advanced, and yet the judicial side of it is medieval and makes no sense.

"Alberto deserves a presumption of innocence, but unfortunately he has now been tarnished with that brush. People will never believe him, whichever way it goes, which is really sad.

"It's not healthy for cycling and not healthy for professional sport. It makes it all look pretty stupid."

Top Stories