Rio Paralympics - joy, tears & memories to last a lifetime

Aaron 'Wheelz' Fotheringham, an extreme wheelchair athlete, flies through the air at the Paralympic opening ceremony
Extreme wheelchair athlete Aaron 'Wheelz' Fotheringham made a spectacular entrance at the start of the opening ceremony which kicked off 11 days of competition
Dame Sarah Storey
Dame Sarah Storey became Great Britain's most successful female Paralympian by winning her 12th gold medal on the opening day in Rio - she would win a further two golds before the Games were over
Xavier Porras wears glasses bearing the motto 'Run and Fly. Never Give Up'
A powerful message of inclusivity underpinned the Games. Here, Spanish blind athlete Xavier Porras displays a message on his blindfold in the final of the men's T11 long jump
Liam Malone, Jonnie Peacock and Felix Streng
Liam Malone, Jonnie Peacock and Felix Streng celebrated with a selfie on the podium after winning their respective medals in the T44 100m final
Ibrahim Hamadtou of Egypt plays table tennis, holding the bat with his mouth
Egypt's Ibrahim Hamadtou showed the world that nothing is impossible when he competed in the table tennis competition. Hamadtou has no arms so he uses his mouth to hold the paddle, and his foot to lift the ball
Andrew Lewis of Great Britain
Great Britain's Andrew Lewis shows the agony and ecstasy of becoming a Paralympic champion, crossing the line in the men's PT2 triathlon
GB's Richard Whitehead
Richard Whitehead had time to turn and salute the crowd after winning the men's T42 200m final - he stormed through the field to take silver in the 100m
Marie-Amelie Le Fur
Here's Marie-Amelie Le Fur jumping for joy after winning gold for France in the women's T44 long jump with a world record
GB's Jess Stretton, Jo Frith and Vicky Jenkins
It was a triple celebration for GB in the W1 individual archery as Jess Stretton took gold, with silver for Jo Frith and a bronze for Vicky Jenkins
Daniel Dias shows emotion on the podium
Daniel Dias became host nation Brazil's most decorated Paralympian after winning nine medals in Rio - four of them gold. He now has 24 in total.
Alfie Hewett and Gordon Reid
Wimbledon champion Gordon Reid (right) followed up on his SW19 triumph by taking the gold medal in the wheelchair tennis singles, beating team-mate Alfie Hewett (left) in the final
Wenpan Huang
China topped the medal table, with swimmer Wenpan Huang taking home six medals
Ihar Boki
Swimmer Ihar Boki of Belarus took home six golds from Rio - giving him a total of 11 gold medals from just two Paralympic Games
GB's Susie Rodgers
Great Britain's swimming team won more medals than the athletics team, and this picture of Susie Rodgers became one of the images of the Games. Rodgers won gold in the S7 50m butterfly
GB's Kadeena Cox
Kadeena Cox became the first Briton since 1988 to win medals in two sports in the same Paralympics, and was chosen to carry the flag for GB in the closing ceremony. She won bronze in the T38 100m athletics, then cycling gold in the C4-5 time trial, then gold in the T38 400m back on the track