Copa America 2015: Brazil meet Colombia, Argentina face Uruguay

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Brazil will face World Cup quarter-final opponents Colombia at the 2015 Copa America after the pair were drawn together in the group stage.

The pair will compete in Group C alongside Peru and Venezuela, while Argentina, holders Uruguay, Paraguay and Jamaica make up Group B.

Group A consists of hosts Chile, Mexico, Ecuador and Bolivia.

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Twelve teams will be competing in the South American showpiece which begins in Santiago on Thursday, 11 June.

Brazil reached the World Cup semi-final with a gripping 2-1 win against Colombia last summer.

The match was notable for the injury sustained by tournament poster boy Neymar, which ruled him out of the last-four tie against Germany.

Barcelona's £75m signing Luis Suarez will miss the Copa America after being suspended for nine competitive Uruguay matches for biting Italian defender Giorgio Chiellini during a World Cup match.

World Cup finalists Argentina's group features a rematch of the 2011 final between Uruguay and Paraguay, while Jamaica are one of two invited nations alongside Mexico.

After the round-robin group phase, the top two teams from each section will qualify for the quarter-finals along with the two best third-placed teams, at which point the tournament takes on a standard knockout format before the final on 4 July.

Copa America 2015
Group AGroup BGroup C
ChileArgentinaBrazil
MexicoUruguayColombia
EcuadorParaguayPeru
BoliviaJamaicaVenezuela
Analysis from South American football journalist Tim Vickery:
"Amazingly, Chile have never won the competition. With perhaps their best side, the pressure will be on them to bring that drought to an end. Argentina, without a senior title since the 1993 Copa, have their own drought to contend with, and Brazil are looking to bounce back from their 2014 humiliation."But there is an aspect to the competition as important as the race for the title. After a year of friendlies the Copa kicks off a new cycle of competitive action in South America. Coaches will aim to come out of Chile with a team whipped into shape for the next set of World Cup qualifiers, which get underway soon afterwards."And the tournament is also a means of investing in football infrastructure. With eight cities staging matches, and the action ranging from north to south, this will be the first time Chile has staged a genuinely nationwide senior competition."

You will be able to follow online coverage of Copa America next June on the BBC Sport website.

Copa America
Copa America director Rene Rozas meets the tournament mascot - a yet-to-be-named culpeo fox
Copa America
Chilean President Michelle Bachelet speaks during the opening of the Copa America 2015 draw in Chile

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