Hugo Lloris: France captain thanks England fans for support

Wayne Rooney and Hugo Lloris
France captain Hugo Lloris shook hands with English counterpart Wayne Rooney after Tuesday's match

France captain Hugo Lloris has thanked England supporters for a "very moving" reception during Tuesday night's friendly at Wembley.

Both sets of fans sang French national anthem La Marseillaise and there was a perfectly observed minute's silence, with the players standing together.

England won 2-0 in a match played four days after the attacks in Paris that left 129 people dead.

"What they did for us was very strong. It was big of them," said Lloris.

"We have to thank the English for the reception they gave us, for their support."

The Wembley arch was lit up in the blue, white and red of the Tricolore on Tuesday, while a giant mosaic in France's national colours decorated one end of the stadium.

England boss Roy Hodgson and his France counterpart Didier Deschamps embraced before kick-off after joining Football Association president Prince William in laying flowers for those killed.

French flag during minute's silence
England and France players lined up around the centre circle for a minute's silence before kick-off

France midfielder Lassana Diarra, who lost his cousin in the attacks on the French capital, was given a standing ovation when he came on as a 57th-minute substitute.

France's game with Germany at the Stade de France on Friday was targeted in the attacks and Tottenham goalkeeper Lloris said their players felt emotionally drained during the defeat by England.

"We couldn't deliver the kind of performance we wanted out on the pitch because we lacked energy," he said.

"The last three days, with the preparations we've had, had clearly taken something out of us.

"There will be better days than this ahead, for all of us."

Lloris said the gestures of solidarity at Wembley sent out a powerful message.

"We're in a privileged position in sport, and above all in football. We have a platform. We could send out a message through our solidarity with the English," he added.

"That message was very strong, very emotional. We lived together. The sense of respect out there was incredible."

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