Swim England: Governing body ASA rebrands and launches four-year strategy

Increased diversity and inclusion in swimming forms one of six key areas of Swim England's strategy
Increased diversity and inclusion in swimming forms one of six key areas of Swim England's strategy

The Amateur Swimming Association (ASA) has been rebranded Swim England as part of a four-year strategy to strengthen the sport and boost participation.

Swimming is England's most popular mass-participation sport, ahead of athletics or cycling, but a 2016 survey found a drop in adult swimming numbers.

The strategy - titled 'Toward a Nation Swimming' - aims for a "significant increase" in participation.

This includes encouraging young people to try other types of aquatic sport.

Women prepare for the start of an open-water festival
Women prepare for the start of an open-water festival

The strategy document cites six areas of focus:

  • strong leadership and advocacy for the sport
  • greater participation numbers
  • increased diversity
  • the elite talent pathway
  • better motivation for the workforce
  • future sustainability.

It details how Swim England will support its 200,000 members and the thousands of young people who take part in weekly swimming lessons, as well as the workforce that teaches and coaches them.

Young people will be encouraged to try diving, water polo and synchronised swimming, and swimmers supported to reach their potential.

Jane Nickerson, who was confirmed last week as Swim England's chief executive, said: "Our vision is a nation swimming and our strategy sets out how we will bring together organisations from across the swimming, health and physical activity sectors to work towards this.

"Leadership and support for our partners are key parts of our strategy and, as such, we have changed from a local delivery organisation to one that is more strategically-focused.

'Toward a Nation Swimming' is the first strategy that focuses solely on swimming in England. Click on the following links to find out more about swimming in Scotland, Wales, and Ireland.