Rio Olympics 2016: Duncan Scott relaxed in Olympic environment

Alloa's teenage Olympian Duncan Scott insists he felt under no pressure as he anchored Great Britain's silver medal-winning 4x100m medley relay team.

Scott won his second silver in Rio as he, Adam Peaty, James Guy and Chris Walker-Hebborn finished behind a United States team including Michael Phelps.

"I haven't had any pressure on me," the 19-year-old told BBC Scotland.

"It's not really felt like what I'd imagined the Olympics would feel like; it's been quite a relaxed atmosphere."

The University of Stirling swimmer, in his first Olympics, had already won a silver medal in the British 4x200m freestyle relay team, a quartet that included fellow Scots Dan Wallace and Stephen Milne, plus Englishman Guy.

And he followed that with a fifth-place finish in the final of the 100m freestyle, equalling the British record of 48.01 seconds he set in the heats.

Silver medallists Chris Walker-Hebborn, Adam Peaty, James Guy and Duncan Scott
Chris Walker-Hebborn, Adam Peaty, James Guy and Duncan Scott display their silver medals from the 4x100m medley relay

"Everybody's enjoyed themselves," said Scott of a British swimming team that won six medals in Rio, twice as many as London four years ago.

"It's great to be part of a British swimming team that is doing so well, it's just phenomenal."

In the 4x100m medley relay final, the British team trailed an exceptional American team, with Phelps winning his fifth Rio gold - and 23rd in all - in a team featuring Ryan Murphy, Cody Miller and Nathan Adrian which set a new Games record of three minutes 27.95 seconds.

"It's unbelievable," Scott added of GB's second-place finish. "There was always a slight chance we could pick up some medals.

"The boys have done an immense job. I've just done my part.

"It's like every year, you taper for every end-of season meet.

"The Worlds last year, the Commonwealth Games the year before, everything's sort of on an upward spiral."

Scott joked that it was "tragic" that he would be returning to Scotland to resume his studies.

"It's back to reality," he said. "It's back to the same old staying up to 2am doing some business work."

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