Australian Open 2016: Johanna Konta can make history - Jo Durie

Johanna Konta
Johanna Konta reached the US Open fourth round in 2014

Johanna Konta has been backed to become the first British woman to reach a grand slam quarter-final since 1984, by the record's current holder Jo Durie.

The British number one, 24, will be one win away from the feat if she beats Czech world number 66 Denisa Allertova on Saturday in round three.

"It's about time someone got to a quarter-final of a slam," Durie said.

Scotland's Andy Murray is also in third-round action, playing Portugal's 32nd seed Joao Sousa.

Time to make history?

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Konta enjoying entertaining crowd

Durie, who ranked a career-high fifth in the world, made the last eight at Wimbledon 32 years ago but no female from Britain has gone as far in a major tournament since.

The wait could be ended by Konta, who has seen nine of the 16 seeds in her half of the draw already knocked out.

The Sydney-born 24-year-old beat former world number one Venus Williams in round one to take her list of top-20 scalps to five since the US Open last year.

"Jo can definitely do it and I wouldn't be sad at all," said Durie.

"Parts of the draw always open up at the Australian Open and you get someone surprising coming through to make the quarter-finals and semi-finals.

"If they're in form, they go through that little gap and I think here for Jo, playing like she is at the moment, that's definitely possible."

Konta, ranked 47th in the world, is already set to rise into the top 40 and beating Allertova could put her in striking distance of the top 30, which would bring seeding at major tournaments.

"I think you could see even last year it wasn't a one-off," Durie said.

"She has the mental side to complement her tennis now, she's very consistent, she does believe so much more in herself and you can see it clearly on court."

Konta faced Allertova in the French Open first round eight months ago, when she lost the longest women's tie-break in the history of grand slams 19-17, and the contest 7-6 4-6 6-2.

"I can get better"

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Murray delights in Groth win

British men's number one Murray has spent just over three-and-a-half hours on court - easily beating Germany's Alexander Zverev and Australia's Sam Groth without dropping a set.

Murray has already defeated Sousa in all of their past six meetings, most recently in the French Open second round last year.

The Portuguese has played Murray twice at the Australian Open - in 2013 and last year - and lost in straight sets on each occasion.

"It's been a very good start, but I can still get better," Murray said.

"I've had days, not just in slams, but in any tournaments, where I felt great, practised really well, and then gone on the court and felt horrible.

"Then sometimes, beforehand you might feel nervous, have a lot of doubts, and then you go out and play extremely well.

"It's difficult to know as a player whether you're going to go out there and hit the ball great or not, you just have to try to trust all of the preparation and practice that you've done."

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