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Amazing things that should happen more often

Expect some fascinating 3D film to come from James Cameron in the near future. The famed director journeyed to the deepest point in the ocean, almost 11km (seven miles) underwater in the Mariana Trench of the West Pacific earlier this week. [BBC]

Teenager Timothy Doner speaks more languages than he is old. The 16-year-old has a total of 23 languages mastered, and you can listen to the interview with the polyglot here. He would make an excellent around-the-world travel partner. [BBC]

Many US national parks are eliminating the sale of plastic bottles on their grounds. Instead, they are pushing reusable water bottles, which often cost less than one dollar more than the plastic one-use versions. [USA Today Travel]

Ready for takeoff
All set to go, but too soon to tell what’s ahead

The 4D cinema (3D combined with effects in the theatre) at the Hong Kong International airport closed down earlier this year, but the world's first airport IMAX theatre is taking its place. With tickets to the 358-seat cinema likely costing a hefty HK$150, will the theatre make enough money to survive? [CNN International]

In an attempt to clean up its image before hosting the 2014 World Cup, Brazilian officials are working to eradicate more than 2,000 websites that promote the country as a sex-tourism destination. The tourism ministry said 1,100 of the sites have already been eliminated. [Bloomberg Businessweek]

This April marks 100 years since the Titanic’s maiden journey and consequent disaster. One cruise line is commemorating a journey by offering an identical cruise, which will stop where the ship sank for a memorial service at exact anniversary. Read on for more details that might generate jitters, or see our Passport blog post about other ways to honour the Titanic tragedy. [Huffington Post]

The future of travel could involve shooting through frictionless vacuum tubes. The first prototype of this revolutionary transport system is being constructed in China, though you can already become financially involved in the project. [Yahoo News]

Turbulence
Hold on folks, we’re in for a rocky ride

As airlines find new and, for passengers, frustrating ways to turn a profit, it's becoming more difficult for passengers to book a seat for free. USA Today writer Bill McGee tried to answer the question of whether airlines are withholding seats to force customers to pay more, but he was only left with more questions. [USA Today]

Donald Trump’s two sons are under investigation for a hunting trip to Zimbabwe, of which photos came out of them posing with killed animals. Conservationists in Zimbabwe are looking into the trip, specifically the safari company the brothers utilized for the trip. [ABC]

Chiang Mai, Thailand, a popular backpacker destination, has a serious pollution problem. One Telegraph journalist relays his personal experiences in the city, where air pollution has even spurred flight cancellations. [The Telegraph]

Cancelled
It’s a no-go

In the biggest news story of the week, a JetBlue plane had to make an emergency landing after one of the plane’s pilots/captains suffered a breakdown. Passengers, one of whom was an off-duty airline captain, had to restrain the man, who was screaming in a paranoid manner about al-Qaida. [The Guardian] Reports surfaced after the incident that the captain had been behaving strangely even at takeoff. [MSNBC] The pilot who acted quickly in the incident is being heralded as a hero, but he is staying out of the spotlight. [The Washington Post]

New research from US scientists show Venice is sinking more than five times faster than previously thought. Before rushing to book tickets to the city before it is underwater, know that the estimated rate is two millimetres a year. Apparently, it’s also tilting. [MSNBC]

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