Fred

  • Cheerful
  • Generous
  • Kind-hearted
How is Fred like this?EvidenceAnalysis
PositiveEven when Scrooge puts down all his talk of Christmas festivities, Fred persists with his good cheer."I'll keep my Christmas humour to the last. So A Merry Christmas, uncle!"We learn about Fred's positive nature from his dialogue. Everything he says focuses on the positive aspects of Christmas.
PersistentFred refuses to let Scrooge's miserly attitude dampen his sprits."I mean to give him the same chance every year, whether he likes it or not, for I pity him."He shows his care for his uncle by pledging to continue visiting Scrooge regardless. His concern is revealed by his persistence and pity.
EnthusiasticWhen Scrooge finally turns up for Christmas dinner, Fred welcomes him in."Let him in! It is a mercy he didn't shake his arm off."Fred's enthusiasm is evident in his hearty welcome, shaking his uncle's hand with force.

Social and historical context

A Victorian family decorate a Christmas tree

Many of the Christmas traditions that we enjoy today began during the Victorian era. Before the 19th-century, Christmas was not celebrated in the way that it is today. It was not even considered a holiday by many businesses.

The practice of sending Christmas cards began during the Victorian times, as did the giving of elaborate and increasingly luxurious gifts on Christmas Day.

The Christmas feast has a longer history, though the popularity of turkey can be attributed to the Victorians. The focus on family and spending time with loved ones also came about in the 1800s.

A Christmas Carol was written during this time and played its part in making these new traditions popular.

Analysing the evidence

quote
"I am sorry, with all my heart, to find you so resolute. We have never had any quarrel, to which I have been a party. But I have made the trial in homage to Christmas, and I'll keep my Christmas humour to the last. So A Merry Christmas, uncle!" "Good afternoon!" said Scrooge. "And A Happy New Year!" "Good afternoon!" said Scrooge. His nephew left the room without an angry word, notwithstanding.Fred wishes Scrooge a merry Christmas
Question

What do we learn about Fred from his dialogue with Scrooge?

"I am sorry, with all my heart, to find you so resolute. We have never had any quarrel, to which I have been a party. But I have made the trial in homage to Christmas, and I'll keep my Christmas humour to the last. So A Merry Christmas, uncle!"

"Good afternoon!" said Scrooge.

"And A Happy New Year!" "Good afternoon!" said Scrooge. His nephew left the room without an angry word, notwithstanding.

  • 'I'll keep my Christmas humour to the last' - Fred insists that he will stay cheerful, despite his uncle's determined unpleasant manner. Through his dialogue we see his insistent cheeriness.
  • '"Good afternoon!" said Scrooge' - in this section of dialogue between Fred and his uncle, Scrooge repeats 'Good afternoon!' four times in total. This way Dickens shows us how determined Fred is to persuade his uncle to join the celebrations.
  • 'without an angry word' - even though Scrooge has been rude to him, Fred maintains his positive and enthusiastic character.