Wales

Speed attempt lawnmower bid preparing at Pendine sands

Don Wales testing the prototype lawnmower at Pendine sands
Image caption Don Wales has already tested the prototype lawnmower at Pendine sands

A British attempt on the world land speed record for a lawnmower is taking place on a beach in Carmarthenshire.

Project Runningblade aims to use a machine built primarily of lawnmower parts to beat the 80.792mph set in 2006. It also cut some grass to qualify.

The team have set out a measured mile on the foreshore and the first test run was successful.

"We will be going for it," said project spokeswoman Clare Hensley-Boyd.

On Sunday, the team hopes to power the mower past the 100mph barrier for a new world record on the Ministry of Defence-controlled foreshore at Pendine Sands.

American Bob Cleveland, the current record holder, has flown in to witness the attempt on his record.

He set his record on Bonneville Salt Flats, Utah.

Project Runningblade's mower is driven by Don Wales, whose grandfather Sir Malcolm Campbell broke the world land speed record at seven-mile long Pendine Sands in 1924.

Bluebird

The British attempt is organised by The National Motor Museum in Beaulieu, Hampshire, which hosts Bluebird, the machine used by Sir Malcolm.

Bluebird is on display at the Welsh Museum of Speed at Pendine while the attempt on the lawnmower land speed record is made.

Challengers must drive over an independently measured mile in one direction and return within an hour.

The course, which includes a mile-and-a-half run up, and the same to slow down, was set out after Saturday's 1455 BST high tide.

Ms Hensley-Boyd said: "It has just taken us probably a good hour-and-a-half longer than we anticipated. We had to walk the course and clear debris.

"It's a learning curve."

Sunday's challenges is expected after 1600 BST.

'Accelerates'

At the beginning of each day, the machine has to cut grass outside the Welsh Musuem of Speed to prove it qualifies as a lawnmower.

Last month the Project Runningblade team took their machine to Pendine Sands to put it through its paces for the first time.

The record attempt is funding raising for Great Ormond Street Hospital for Sick Children and Wessex Heartbeat.

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