Traditional Somerset pub turned into gingerbread inn for Christmas

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Image caption The traditional country pub has been transformed into a giant gingerbread house in time for Christmas

A landlord has turned his country pub into a giant gingerbread house in time for Christmas.

Mark Walton has transformed the Queen Victoria Inn at Priddy, in Somerset, with giant candy canes, sherbet, lollipops, liquorice allsorts and of course gingerbread men.

Renamed The Gingerbread Inn, Mr Walton said the idea came about "over a drink with fellow nutters one January night".

An official Christmas lights switch-on was held on Thursday night.

Image caption The traditional country pub has been covered in candy canes, gingerbread men, sweets and liquorice allsorts
Image caption Last year, the pub installed a festive "bottle tree" made out of 1,100 glass bottles wrapped in 300m (984ft) of fairy lights

Described as the "world's largest gingerbread inn", Mr Walton said it took two local artists around three weeks to create the oversized sweets and treats covering his pub.

"They were creating the decorations in their house, so they were glad to get them out," he said.

"And it took four days solid to put them up and my electrician - who did the lights - was hanging off the roof for a whole day."

Image caption Described as the "Worlds largest Gingerbread Inn", Mr Walton said it took two local artists around three weeks to create the oversized decorations
Image caption The Gingerbread Inn is expected to remain in place until "well into January".
Image caption An official Christmas lights switch-on was held on Thursday night

Last year, the pub installed a 15ft festive "bottle tree" made out of 1,100 glass bottles wrapped in 300m (984ft) of fairy lights.

This year, Mr Walton said the reaction from locals to his creation has been "amazement really".

"We've got the lot - giant candy canes, sherbet, Quality Street, bubble gum, lollipops and even the occasional drumstick and it's all made out of polystyrene, drain pipes, beach balls - everything," he said.

"So no, it's not edible but it is amazing and it looks fantastic."

As gingerbread houses are "not just for Christmas", according to Mr Walton, the Gingerbread Inn is expected to remain in place until "well into January".