Newspaper headlines: 'Freedom at a price' as Queen seals 'hard Megxit'

Prince Harry and Meghan Image copyright AFP

The Sunday Telegraph believes there are no winners as a result of what many of the front pages are calling "Megxit" - the exit of the Duke an Duchess of Sussex as front-line royals.

There is a comment piece on the front, which expresses broad support for the Queen's decision - which the paper says was not to let Harry and Meghan "have their cake and eat it".

But it suggests that some might find the idea of stripping Prince Harry of his military appointments "overly punitive". And it argues the Queen and the Royal Family have lost one of their most popular figures.

Under the headline "can't have the chateau and the gateau", the Sunday Mirror welcomes the fact that Harry and Meghan will no longer be allowed to use their HRH titles.

"Only those who do the work of Royal Highnesses should be allowed to call themselves such," it says. It goes on to commend the way the Queen has handled the situation, concluding that she has "acted decisively but compassionately".

The Sunday Express says the two statements released yesterday evening by the Queen could not show more clearly the heartbreak she is suffering as a result of Harry and Meghan's departure.

'Oversight'

It points out that with the couple planning to spend much of their time in Canada, the Queen is in effect losing her grandson and his wife, whom it says "she had tried to guide through the role required of her".

There's a piece in the Mail on Sunday written by Princess Diana's former private secretary, Patrick Jephson.

He believes Saturday night's statements pose more questions than they answer. Primary among them is what will come of Sussex Royal, Harry and Meghan's trademark.

"We must assume," he says, "that any restrictions on its use - and some kind of oversight mechanism - are still under discussion".

The Sunday Times reveals that Boris Johnson is considering a plan to move the House of Lords to York.

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It reports that disused government-owned land, close to the city's railway station, has already been identified as a possible place to build a new second chamber.

The Sunday Times says that if York was chosen, it would be the first time it had been a centre of political power since the 17th Century - during the English civil war. But it also suggests that Birmingham is in the running.

According to the paper, a final decision will be made by a constitutional review to be launched in the spring.

The headline on the front of the Observer is: "PM to cabinet: shape up or I'll sack you within weeks".

It says the prime minister is to tell ministers that they must focus all their energy on developing policies for post-Brexit Britain.

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Those who fail to come up with good ideas will, the paper says, face the sack in an impending reshuffle.

The Sun on Sunday has the same story, but concentrates on a different aspect of it - an order by Mr Johnson that ministers should work flat out on their policy ideas, while avoiding being interviewed on the television or radio.

The headline is: "Shut yer gob, keep yer job".