Trump sheds light on his crucial error at Putin summit

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Media captionTrump says he "misspoke" at Putin summit, but is it too late? Anthony Zurcher explains

As the lights briefly went out at the White House, Donald Trump said he was in the dark about why he faced a backlash over Monday's summit with Russian leader Vladimir Putin.

Can changing one word fix that? The BBC's Anthony Zurcher examines Donald Trump's explanation.

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Trump-Putin summit: After Helsinki, the fallout at home

U.S. President Donald Trump and Russia"s President Vladimir Putin shake hands during a joint news conference after their meeting in Helsinki, Finland, July 16, 2018 Image copyright Reuters

The Helsinki summit between Vladimir Putin and Donald Trump is over, and after nearly two hours behind closed doors and another hour in front of the press, there's plenty of material to sort through.

Leading into the meeting, Democrats were warning Mr Trump to be careful in dealing with his Russian counterpart - with some suggesting that it was unwise for the US president to even hold such an event, given Friday's indictments of 12 Russian military officers for conducting cyber-warfare against the US during the 2016 elections.

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Four intriguing lines in Mueller indictment

Rod Rosenstein unveils the latest round of indictments from the special counsel office. Image copyright Getty Images

Call it the Friday the 13th surprise.

In painstaking detail, Robert Mueller's special counsel team laid out what it alleges was a concerted effort by the Russian military to hack the Democratic National Committee and senior-level Clinton campaign officials and disseminate private documents in order to disrupt and influence the 2016 US presidential election.

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Brett Kavanaugh: Trump Supreme Court pick under microscope

Brett Kavanaugh smiles during an appearance on Capitol Hill. Image copyright Getty Images

The reality television show drama is over. Donald Trump has unveiled his new Supreme Court pick. Now the debate about Brett Kavanaugh - his merits as a judge and his future on the court - can begin.

Mr Kavanaugh has served as a circuit court judge for 12 years, giving him a lengthy legal record for supporters and critics to pore over. Given that a number of major cases loom on the Supreme Court's horizon, his views and positions - and how he might vote on the closely divided court - will be closely scrutinised.

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Trump's Supreme Court shortlist: Go big or play safe?

Federal appeals court judges L-R: Raymond Kethledge, Brett Kavanaugh, Amy Coney Barrett, and Thomas Hardiman, being considered for the US Supreme Court. Image copyright Reuters
Image caption L-R: Raymond Kethledge, Brett Kavanaugh, Amy Coney Barrett, and Thomas Hardiman

And then there were four. Maybe. Multiple news outlets have reported that President Donald Trump has narrowed his search for the next US Supreme Court justice down to one of four names - Brett Kavanaugh, Amy Coney Barrett, Raymond Kethledge and Thomas Hardiman.

All four currently serve as judges on US courts of appeals - the level below the Supreme Court in the federal judiciary system. All four were among the 25 names on Mr Trump's Supreme Court candidate list, the first version of which Mr Trump released during his 2016 presidential campaign to help convince conservatives he would fill court vacancies with choices to their liking.

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Will Amy Coney Barrett be Trump's Supreme Court pick?

Amu Coney Barrett Image copyright C-Span
Image caption Amy Coney Barrrett

One of the names on Donald Trump's Supreme Court shortlist is a 46-year-old appellate court judge, former law professor and mother of seven.

She could also end up being a political lightning rod in the biggest confirmation battle of modern US history.

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A US civility crisis: Total political war

Trump at a Rally in ND Image copyright Getty Images

Interrupted dinners, driveway confrontations, threatening leaflets. Donald Trump administration officials are increasingly facing harassment from liberals enraged by the president's words and actions.

Is it a reflection of an increasingly acrimonious political environment, a sign that liberals are spinning out of control or a reasonable response by citizens faced with what some see as a historic national crisis and a president who critics say likes to stoke the fires of discord? It depends on who you ask and - in an increasing fractured US society - their partisan proclivities.

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Supreme Court: Why a fight over US abortion law now looms

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Media captionFear or opportunity? Liberals and conservatives on what's next for the US Supreme Court

Anthony Kennedy was a swing vote on the US Supreme Court, albeit one that frequently tilted to the right. Replacing him with a solidly conservative justice, however, could have a significant impact on US jurisprudence - and politics - for decades to come.

Here's a look at some of the most consequential issues.

Abortion

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Is it fair for a politician to use Tinder to win votes?

Suraj Patel Image copyright Suraj Patel
Image caption Patel says it's time to try new tools of campaigning

Political campaigns are desperate to find new ways to reach voters.

But that's not easy in an age when many Americans - particularly young adults - barely answer the phone when it rings and skip over or filter out television, radio and internet advertisements.

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What is Donald Trump's family-separation endgame?

Donald Trump speaks at the White House. Image copyright Getty Images

For months we've been heading toward this moment, a political conflagration on the border over immigrant policy. But what is Donald Trump's endgame - and why?

In May the New York Times reported that Donald Trump had berated Homeland Security Secretary Kristjen Nielsen over what he viewed as her failure to aggressively enforce border security and urged her to begin the process that would result in undocumented children being taken away from their parents.

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