Pluribus: Facebook heralds its 'superhuman' poker-playing AI

Image copyright Facebook
Image caption The bot is being regarded as a breakthrough - an AI that can compete against multiple opponents

Facebook’s artificial intelligence team has made what it describes as a “superhuman” poker champion, a bot with the ability to beat world-leading human pros.

Facebook is heralding the AI bot, named Pluribus, as a major breakthrough: the first capable of beating as many as six players, in a game that involves “hidden” information - the cards that are yet to be revealed.

The team’s research also makes humbling reading for any poker players proud of their ability to spot a “tell”.

“We think of bluffing as this very human trait,” explained Noam Brown, the lead researcher from Facebook’s AI team, speaking to BBC News.

“But what we see is that bluffing is actually mathematical behaviour. When the bot ‘bluffs’, it doesn’t view it as deceptive or dishonest, it’s just the way to make the most money.”

Read full article Pluribus: Facebook heralds its 'superhuman' poker-playing AI

Instagram now asks bullies: 'Are you sure?'

Bullying message on Instagram Image copyright Instagram

Instagram believes its new anti-bullying tool, which prompts users to pause and consider what they are saying, could help curb abuse on the platform.

It will also soon offer the targets of bullying the ability to restrict interactions with users who are causing them distress.

Read full article Instagram now asks bullies: 'Are you sure?'

Facebook may be 'pivoting' to something worse

Mark Zuckerberg wants to shift Facebook users into being more private Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption Mark Zuckerberg wants to shift Facebook users into being more private

Over the past few months, Mark Zuckerberg has spoken at length about his grand plan for fixing Facebook.

In short, it involves “pivoting” - as they say - to a more private social network. One which focuses on closed spaces, like groups or messaging, rather than the public News Feed.

Read full article Facebook may be 'pivoting' to something worse

Amazon's next big thing may redefine big

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Media captionAmazon executive Werner Vogels on the ethics of facial recognition

"I see Amazon as a technology company that just happened to do retail," begins Werner Vogels, Amazon's chief technology officer.

"When Jeff [Bezos] started Amazon, he wasn't thinking about starting a bookshop. He was really fascinated by the internet.”

Read full article Amazon's next big thing may redefine big

Human staff will always be needed, Amazon insists

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Media caption"You need both" - Amazon's Tye Brady on robotics replacing humans

Amazon’s warehouses will always need human staff, the firm’s chief robotics technologist has told the BBC.

The company said it had deployed more than 200,000 warehouse robots working in around 50 of its locations.

Read full article Human staff will always be needed, Amazon insists

Nancy Pelosi clip shows misinformation still has a home on Facebook

The video of Nancy Pelosi had been slowed by 25% Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption The video of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi had been slowed by 25%

Facebook has said it won’t remove a doctored video that makes Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi appear incoherent. One upload of the clip has been viewed more than 2.5 million times - and remains visible.

"There’s a tension here,” Facebook said, between allowing free speech, and preventing the spread of fake news.

Read full article Nancy Pelosi clip shows misinformation still has a home on Facebook

Huawei's microchip vulnerability explained

The Huawei P30 Pro motherboard, which uses tech sourced internationally (Picture provided by iFixIt.com) Image copyright iFixIt
Image caption The Huawei P30 Pro motherboard, which uses tech sourced internationally (Picture provided by iFixIt.com)

Google’s announcement that it was no longer able to work with Huawei is just one repercussion of the US decision to add the Chinese tech giant to its “entity list” of companies American firms cannot work with.

The true impact to Huawei may be enormous. While we often refer to the firm's devices as simply “Chinese”, the reality is much more complicated - it sources parts and expertise from all over the world. The same can be said for the likes of Apple, of course, which relies at least in part on chips created by its rival, Samsung.

Read full article Huawei's microchip vulnerability explained

Microsoft and Sony strike games streaming deal

Analysts say Sony needs the outside expertise and infrastructure if its to move into streaming higher quality games Image copyright Getty Images

Microsoft and Sony have formed a partnership on video games streaming, despite being fierce competitors.

It is expected Sony will use Microsoft’s Azure cloud service to host its upcoming PlayStation streaming service.

Read full article Microsoft and Sony strike games streaming deal

WhatsApp discovers 'targeted' surveillance attack

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Image caption WhatsApp has 1.5bn users, but it believed the attacks were highly-targeted

Hackers were able to remotely install surveillance software on phones and other devices using a major vulnerability in messaging app WhatsApp, it has been confirmed.

WhatsApp, which is owned by Facebook, said the attack targeted a "select number" of users and was orchestrated by "an advanced cyber-actor".

Read full article WhatsApp discovers 'targeted' surveillance attack

'Silicon Valley nonsense': Will Uber drivers be heard?

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Media captionRide-share drivers unite in US strike

Uber drivers protested around the world on Wednesday. It was a spirited, though largely unquantifiable, demonstration against what they see as disgracefully low wages, poor job security, and an unacceptable lack of benefits.

Above all, though, it was a rallying cry against the expanding gulf between their lives, and the lives of those who will become unfathomably rich when Uber makes its stock market debut on Friday.

Read full article 'Silicon Valley nonsense': Will Uber drivers be heard?