Iraq Yazidis: The 'forgotten' people of an unforgettable story

A destroyed car left behind by fleeing Yazidis while they were escaping an IS invasion on 3 August 2014 (2016 picture) Image copyright Getty Images

In the ancestral land of the Yazidis, a sacred mountain looms large.

A persecuted people has long seen it as their protector.

"Sinjar mountain saved me, and many other Yazidis, four years ago," says Hade Shingaly as we sit on thin mattresses covered with bright geometric patterns in his family's elongated tent.

It is perched in a tidy cluster of tarpaulin shacks on a mountain plateau in this remote corner of Iraq.

Through a window of plastic sheeting, we can see Sinjar's rocky brown slopes speckled with scruffy green shrubs.

Image caption Four years after the IS invasion, Hade, his family and many others still live on the slopes of Sinjar mountain

Read full article Iraq Yazidis: The 'forgotten' people of an unforgettable story

Ending Yemen’s never-ending war

A Yemeni artist paints a pro-peace graffiti on a wall in Sanaa, Yemen (16 August 2018) Image copyright EPA

"Some people say we are in a hurry," says Martin Griffiths, the UN's special envoy for Yemen. "I plead guilty to the charge."

"The people of Yemen have suffered quite enough. It's time."

Read full article Ending Yemen’s never-ending war

Rebuilding Aleppo: Life beyond Syria's civil war

Partially ruined buildings in Aleppo

"I fell in love, I don't know why," confesses Alaa al-Sayed with a lingering gaze towards his beloved.

The object of affection for this Syrian historian is the ancient gate of Bab al-Nasr, the Victory Gate.

Read full article Rebuilding Aleppo: Life beyond Syria's civil war

Saudi Arabia detentions: Living inside 'five-star prison'

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Media captionA peek inside the Ritz-Carlton as it hosts those suspected of corruption

Riyadh's palatial Ritz-Carlton hotel, branded as "a retreat for those who simply desire the royal treatment", now finds itself transformed into a nerve centre for an audacious manoeuvre by an ambitious crown prince.

It's not the treatment more than 200 of Saudi Arabia's richest and most powerful ever expected, and certainly never desired, when 32-year old Mohammed Bin Salman launched what was billed as an unprecedented drive against corruption and abuse of power and privilege in the kingdom.

Read full article Saudi Arabia detentions: Living inside 'five-star prison'

Riyadh's night of long knives and long-range missiles

Former Lebanese Prime Minister Saad Hariri speaks at a conference in Beirut, Lebanon, on 3 November 2017 Image copyright EPA
Image caption Saad Hariri said he feared an assassination plot, accusing Iran and Hezbollah of breeding strife

A night of long knives and long-range missiles in Riyadh has provoked another seismic shift across a volatile Middle East and nervous uncertainty over what salvos will follow next.

Three events that happened suddenly on Saturday in the Saudi capital were not directly linked. But, all told, they pack a powerful punch at a time when Saudi Arabia and its key partners, including the United States, are showing ever greater resolve to confront their arch rival, Iran.

Read full article Riyadh's night of long knives and long-range missiles

From boring to hip: Canada's changing international reputation

Woman with Canada glasses Image copyright Getty Images

It's hard to forget that first rude awakening when you realise what others really think of your country.

For me, it was February 1988.

Read full article From boring to hip: Canada's changing international reputation

Qatar crisis deepens as Gulf sides stand their ground

Men walk along Doha corniche (file photo) Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption Qatar was cut off by its Gulf neighbours earlier this month

Three weeks in to the worst Gulf crisis in decades, questions are still being asked about why unprecedented diplomatic and economic sanctions were imposed on the state of Qatar by its powerful neighbours.

Now even Washington is expressing doubt.

Read full article Qatar crisis deepens as Gulf sides stand their ground

The couple who want to rebuild their shattered city

  • 21 April 2017
  • From the section Magazine
Marwa al-Sabouni and Ghassan Jansiz

Someday, what seems like Syria's forever war will end. Then the focus will shift to rebuilding a country shredded and scarred by conflict. A husband and wife, both architects, who witnessed their city's devastation are already thinking about how to restore it.

"It's not easy to rise from the ruins, it's not easy," reflects Marwa al-Sabouni.

Read full article The couple who want to rebuild their shattered city

Eta's violent campaign ends with hardly a whisper

  • 10 April 2017
  • From the section Europe
View of graffiti in support of Eta in San Sebastian, Basque Country, northern Spain (09 April 2017) Image copyright EPA
Image caption Eta still exists even though it has now closed an important chapter of its history

In the final days before the Basque separatist group Eta gave up its guns, mediators spoke of "jitters" over whether this long-awaited moment would go according to plan.

And as we drove into San Sebastian, in the heart of Spain's Basque region, we were halted by road blocks and stern faced police in black uniforms, guns pressed against their chests.

Read full article Eta's violent campaign ends with hardly a whisper

Islamic State leaves trail of destruction in Syria's Palmyra

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Media captionLyse Doucet surveys the damage to Palmyra's Roman-era theatre

Fariha remembers the exact moment when Islamic State fighters shattered her life in Palmyra.

"It was a quarter to five in the morning. We were asleep and heard a knock on the door," she tells me as we sit on thin, grey mattresses in an abandoned school in Homs, 160km (99 miles) from her home.

Read full article Islamic State leaves trail of destruction in Syria's Palmyra