Will Trump bring 'America First' to United Nations?

View of United Nations Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption The New York neighbourhood known as Turtle Bay is slowly being sequestered from the rest of Manhattan ahead of the UN General Assembly

Patrol boats are darting up and down the East River. The NYPD coffee and donut truck will soon be parked on 42nd Street.

The New York neighbourhood known as Turtle Bay is slowly being sequestered from the rest of Manhattan, the temporary border marked by concrete bollards, metal railings and a small army of police officers.

The annual carnival of global diplomacy is about to begin.

The United Nations General Assembly. Or UNGA, as it is known within an organisation addicted to acronyms. Or #UNGA, to use the hashtag hieroglyphics of this social media age.

Not diplomacy by Twitter, but the face-to-face real thing.

Read full article Will Trump bring 'America First' to United Nations?

Resurgent anti-Trump 'resistance' defines a divided America

Illustration of Donald Trump with Meghan McCain, Bob Woodward, Colin Kaepernick and Barack Obama Image copyright BBC/Getty Images

September is emerging as a month of defiance, a milestone moment in the Trump presidency when the forces of 'the resistance' are asserting themselves more strongly.

The Labor Day holiday usually ushers in a change in the political seasons. This year, however, it has been the confluence of separate but interlocking events.

Read full article Resurgent anti-Trump 'resistance' defines a divided America

Why the Woodward effect damages Trump

Bob Woodward Image copyright Getty Images

The publication of Fear: Trump in the White House pits America's commander in chief against Washington's chronicler in chief. The credibility contest is key.

I wonder how many journalists have arrived in Washington over the years dreaming of becoming the next Bob Woodward. Hoping that they'll be invited to descend into some subterranean car park, where a high-ranking contact, another "Deep Throat", mutters cryptic, and not-so cryptic instructions: "follow the money". Perhaps they've imagined being played in a movie by a Robert Redford or his female equivalent. Perhaps they have fantasised about bringing down a president.

Read full article Why the Woodward effect damages Trump

An incomplete history of American protest

Media playback is unsupported on your device
Media captionAn incomplete history of protest

An exhibit at the Whitney Museum in New York looks back at moments in US history that inspired mass protest.

Read full article An incomplete history of American protest

Bye Bye Bannon, Washington's second most powerful man

Steve Bannon profile shot in darkly lit image Image copyright Reuters
Image caption Chief strategist Steve Bannon has become the latest casualty of the Trump White House

Is Steve Bannon the second most powerful man in the world? The question was posed by Time magazine back in February, when it placed the then White House chief strategist on its coveted cover.

Bannon was said to be Donald Trump's alter ago, a Svengali-like figure whose fingerprints were everywhere: from the fiercely nationalistic "American carnage" inaugural address to the decision to leave the Paris Climate Change Agreement, from the botched travel ban to the White House onslaught against the "fake media" - who Bannon memorably labelled "the opposition party."

Read full article Bye Bye Bannon, Washington's second most powerful man

The end of the Anglo-American order?

US President Donald Trump (R) reacts as he sits next to Britain"s Prime Minister Theresa May (C) and Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan (L) during a working dinner meeting at the NATO summit in Brussels, Belgium, 25 May 2017 Image copyright AFP

There has always been a shared conceit at the heart of the special relationship between the United States and United Kingdom that global leadership is best expressed and exerted in English.

More boastful than the Brits, successive US presidents have trumpeted the notion of American exceptionalism.

Read full article The end of the Anglo-American order?

Why the UK election isn't exciting Americans

Britain"s Prime Minister Theresa May, US President Donald Trump and German Chancellor Angela Merkel arrive to watch an Italian flying squadron during the Summit of the Heads of State and of Government of the G7, the group of most industrialized economies, plus the European Union, on May 26, 2017 Image copyright Getty Images

When it comes to the UK election, Americans have hardly been grabbing the popcorn. Box office it is not. And up against the summer blockbuster of the Trump presidency it looks more like a village hall production - the vicar's daughter playing the lead.

Modern-day movie-goers like franchises, with characters and plotlines that are instantly recognisable; with over-arching themes that comport with a broader narrative. The French presidential election fitted that bill, with Marine Le Pen cast as the female Trump, the face of populist fury.

Read full article Why the UK election isn't exciting Americans

Comey sacking doesn't rise to Watergate levels

Nixon and trump in White House Image copyright BBC/Reuters

The New York Times called for the president to leave office immediately, describing it as "the last great service" he could perform for the country.

The Washington Post demanded impeachment, followed by a Senate trial. Time magazine, deeming it necessary to publish its first-ever editorial, thundered: "The president should resign."

Read full article Comey sacking doesn't rise to Watergate levels

Will Republicans learn the limits of oppositional politics?

US Speaker of the House Republican Paul Ryan (R) gestures during a news conference beside House Majority Leader Republican Kevin McCarthy (L), following a Republican conference meeting on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, USA, 28 March 2017 Image copyright EPA

"All politics is local," was the famed dictum of the legendary House Speaker Tip O'Neill.

O'Neill hailed from an age when lawmakers had a more intimate relationship with the voters who sent them to Washington and were also more willing to cut deals with their partisan adversaries.

Read full article Will Republicans learn the limits of oppositional politics?

Drip of Russia revelations puts damper on Trump's 'home run'

trump and putin nesting dolls Image copyright Getty Images

A week that began with a reset ended with Russia, the scandal that refuses to go away.

On Tuesday night, when Donald Trump delivered his first speech before a joint session of Congress, there was a new tone, in marked contrast to the shrillness of his American carnage inaugural, and even new tailoring, a more sleekly fitted suit.

Read full article Drip of Russia revelations puts damper on Trump's 'home run'