In pictures: Harley riders in the saddle

Published
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Ed Gold has been using an iPod Touch to take photographs at the House of Harley in Anchorage, which draws bikers from across Alaska and beyond. Here is a selection of the work. This is Bruce Steely and his granddaughter Mia.
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Jay Ward joined the United States Air Force in 1968 and spent three years in Vietnam on the Super Jolly Green Giant helicopters. "I was a PJ - a pararescueman," he says. "I would be lowered down on a penetrator - a three-pronged steel hook - in through the jungle canopy. Just going in and getting out the GIs who had been shot down. You go down, and you've got all sorts of enemy down there trying to shoot you with small arms. And, besides that, the aeroplanes we flew in were just tin cans."
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Karen Och says: "This is the first Harley I have owned - but I'm a police officer and in my last job, in North Carolina, I rode a police Harley Electra Glide for two and a half years."
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Grant Jones says: "The military brought me here, US Air Force for 22 years. It's totally different in Alaska. The people are really friendly. When we first got to here, we felt we had come home."
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Patti Bogan has clocked up about half a million miles in the saddle of a Harley.
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Benher Robert Taylor says: "The Harley is the boss's boss, you know what I'm saying? You're the biggest man in camp. Even if you've only got a cent in your pocket, you've got a million dollars right there. You get so much respect from your fellow bikers."
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Mark Haldane says: "I love Anchorage. It's got the amenities of the big city, but the outdoors is real close. I'm real lucky I live on a bicycle trail, I'm big into the outdoors here."
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Rita Brenner did not ride solo until the age of 63 - but, since April last year, she has covered more than 30,000 miles on her Harley Tri Glide Ultra. "It's a freedom that you can't really describe," she says. "Most people don't understand that when you are going down the road, you can smell everything around you. It's a moving picture, just the freedom of not having something encumbering you."
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Sarah Luchaco Coe works at the House of Harley and describes herself as an "air traffic controller in Alaska for bikers".
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"The thing that inspired the kind of vagabond lifestyle on a motorcycle was a TV show called Then Came Bronson. And that show was about a guy that gave up his city life and jumped on a bike to explore the world. I think it was on for one season," says this man, known as Chief.
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All photographs by Ed Gold. To see more of his work go to: http://www.edgold.co.uk

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