In Pictures

In pictures: What is your London?

A group of young people were asked "What is your London?" The aim was to capture their London, to offer an alternative view of the capital to that seen on picture postcards. This is a selection of photographs from the five-week intensive course mentored by photographer Lua Ribeira."

Yumi Codner

A woman standing in the road Image copyright Yumi Codner
Image caption Ms Jordan Clarke models for Yumi's "Red Butterflies" series
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"London has increasingly become more and more crowded over time," says Codner.

"It can be quite challenging for those who have anxiety, daily to live in such an environment.

"My pictures, called Red Butterflies, express and illustrate the feelings that anxiety can cause, in a poetic way."

A woman standing in a busy high street Image copyright Yumi Codner
Image caption Ms Jordan Clarke on a busy high street
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Eric Barberini

Barberini has spent the past year moving between Cardiff and London while caring for his granddad and pursuing a career in photography.

He says this has only been made possible by the family and friends who opened up their homes to him.

These are those moments and memories that made up his London.

Two men in their living room Image copyright Eric Aydin Barberini
A living room with two boys on a couch Image copyright Eric Aydin Barberini
Two young men on in a park Image copyright Eric Aydin Barberini

Vanessa Ansong

"London is one of the most diverse cities in the world, our diversity is one of our greatest strengths," says Ansong.

"Being African-British, born and bred in London, I wanted to create a series that celebrates the ethnographic that represents our cities.

Portrait Image copyright Vanessa Ansong
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"For my project, Deep-rooted, I asked people to pose for me using African prints as a poetic means to explore our roots, through the use of colours, patterns and textures.

Portrait Image copyright Vanessa Ansong
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"Everyone has a story to tell, whether it's culturally or not. London makes everyone different - and that's a good thing."

Marcella Chan

"Traditional Foods explores my East Asian and British culture, through food and kitchen tools, producing colourful displays of food combinations that aren't quite what they seem," says Chan.

Custard cream fortune cookies and fortune cookies Image copyright Marcella Chan
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International biscuits being dunked into tea Image copyright Marcella Chan
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Bowl of food from different nationalities
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Maria Quigley

"Perched over a half-eaten sandwich, I watched them all swarm by as they got what they could from the city," Quigley writes. "The grey-suited striding resting pecking racing chattering opportunists."

Pigeon and city workers Image copyright Maria Quigley
Pigeon and city workers Image copyright Maria Quigley

Naila Tasnim

"As a Punjabi Muslim woman in the West, I am constantly negotiating contrasting cultural subjectivities," says Tasnim.

"My work attempts to capture the disorientation, displacement and elation experienced by those who exist at the intersection of these spheres.

Food and flowers Image copyright Naila Tasnim
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"London is a place where I can freely explore all aspects of my identity and, through the use of colour and fabric, I envision the harmony and disjointedness that arises when conflicting ideologies converge."

Timi Akindele-Ajani

See Me Not is Akindele-Ajani's exploration of how humans interact in the city and how people behave towards those who work within the service industry.

"They refuse to treat them as individuals, instead they interact with them much like they would with a machine", he says.

Photomontage of TFL employee Image copyright Timi Akindele-Ajani
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Photomontage of subway employee Image copyright Timi Akindele-Ajani
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Photomontage of pret employee Image copyright Timi Akindele-Ajani
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David Adesanya

"At present, we are the most globalised we have ever been in the history of humanity, yet so disconnected," Adesanya says.

"I found this paradox to be a pressing discussion in London and wondered... What if a consistent conversation could emerge? Not from the politicians, not from the mayors or county leaders, but from the people on the ground now? What then?

Cross in a globe Image copyright David Adesanya

"With a camera, globe and those intentions in mind, I took to the streets to discover what grounded the people of London when the struggles and pressures of life unsettled their foundation."

Rachael Simoes

Bargains celebrates style and explores the materialism in young working-class London.

A girl holds up bags of takeaways Image copyright Rachael Simoes
Rachael Simoes squats by skips Image copyright Rachael Simoes

The programme, organised by Create Jobs and Magnum Photos, and supported by The Mayor's Fund for London and The HudsonBec Group, aims to give young creative talent in London the connections, skills, knowledge and inspiration to tell stories that are important to them and to bring about social change. The brief, "What is your London?" was set by It's Nice That, Anyways and Lecture in Progress who worked with Lua Ribeira.

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